International Women’s Day: A Celebration of Women in Dentistry

Times have certainly changed since 1898, when Emma Gaudreau Casgrain became the first woman licensed to be a dentist in Canada. Today women are a growing force in the dental industry within Canada and beyond. According to the Canadian Institute for Health Information, the number of women dentists in Canada rose from 16 percent in 1991 to 28 percent in 2001. By 2011, the proportion had grown to 29.5.

International Women’s Day is the ideal time to take a closer look at the role of women in the field of dentistry.

More Women Are Graduating With Dentistry Degrees

The number of women practicing dentistry in Canada should continue growing with women graduating with dentistry degrees than men. For example, in 2016, 34 women graduated from the University of British Columbia’s (UBC) dentistry schools for every 24 males. Many dentists estimate roughly half of their graduating class members were women.

Dr. Alison Fransen, a general dentist at Wesbrook Village Dental Centre who graduated from UBC in 1997, said she had a “great experience in dental school,” which gave her “lots to learn.”

Dr. Wise Tang, a general dentist at Burnaby’s Mega Dental Group, added her experience of going through dentistry school and finding employment was “Challenging, but very rewarding.”

Dr. Julia McKay and Dr. Carlos Quiñonez, in their article “The Feminization of Dentistry: Implications for the Profession” published in the Journal of the Canadian Dental Association, stated female dental students bring something different to the classroom than their male peers. Female students are more emotionally sensitive and expressive, qualities which help them socialize with other students and respond to the patients they see during internships and hands-on course components.

Women in Dentistry Have Prominent Female Figures to Inspire Them

More Women Are Graduating With Dentistry DegreesIn her 2006 Psychology of Women Quarterly article “Someone like me can be successful: Do college students need same-gender role models?,” Penelope Lockwood explained female students are significantly more influenced by a role model’s gender than male students.

Female students, she wrote, feel much more motivated when reading about a successful woman in their field than a successful man. When citing career role models, female students also tended to identify women they look up to, largely because they felt they may face similar industry challenges to the women that inspired them. It’s significant that as more women excel in dentistry, more women are inspired to follow in their footsteps.

Burnaby dentist Dr. Wise Tang says Dr. Karen Burgess, who she observed practice during her volunteer program, is one of her greatest inspirations. Dr. Burgess is a trailblazing oral pathologist who works closely with Dr. Jonathan Irish diagnosing and treating mouth cancers at Princess Margaret’s Dental Oncology, Ocular, and Maxillofacial Prosthetics Clinic. This clinic is the busiest of its kind in Canada, seeing 14,000 patients every year.

Vancouver dentist Dr. Alison Fransen still considers Dr. Marcia Boyd, the dean while Dr. Fransen studied at UBC Dentistry, one of her greatest career role models. An Order of Canada recipient, Dr. Boyd was the first Canadian woman to serve as the president of the American College of Dentists. She also led a task force on the future of organized dentistry in British Columbia for the province’s College of Dental Surgeons and was an organizer and speaker for the American Dental Education Association’s International Women’s Leadership Conference.

Female Dentists Are Providing a Different Experience for Patients

Female Dentists Tend to Work DifferentlyFor centuries, a trip to the dentist has been perceived as something to fear. However, as more women enter the field, that perception is slowly changing, according to McKay and Quiñonez. While most female dentists don’t think their professional experiences are any different from those of their male counterparts, studies show female dentists bring different traits and practices to their clinics.

Female dentists are said to be more empathetic and better able to communicate with their patients. They seem to be less rushed and willing to discuss their patients’ ailments and concerns in a more caring, humane way than male dentists. Just 8 percent of female dentists expect their patients to experience pain in the chair compared to 46 percent of male dentists. This suggests female dentists will often take greater care to reduce the pain their patients experience than male dentists.

Female Dentists Tend to Work Differently

Once dental practices were male-dominated spaces, but today female representation is at an all time high. In fact, one-third of the dentists at 123 Dentists are women. Female dentists can also bring a different kind of decision-making to any practice, according to self-reported research cited by McKay and Quiñonez. Men replied in a survey that they usually base their decisions on objectivity, logic, and consistency, while the women reported being more motivated by how they feel. Their personal values, sympathies, and desire to maintain harmony and tact are important factors in patient care.

Female Dentists Tend to Work DifferentlyThe personal qualities women typically possess see them spearheading unique dental programs like Ontario’s Project Restoring Smiles. The women behind this initiative provide free dental procedures to survivors of domestic violence who are self-conscious about what their abuse has done to their smiles. These dentists provides extensive procedures costing thousands, including orthodontics, bleaching, crowns and bridges, root canals, extractions, dental implants, and surgical facial reconstruction free of charge.

“Our vision is to restore confidence in women who have survived domestic violence by addressing the physical effects of abuse,” Dr. Tina Meisami explained in a statement cited by women’s blog SheKnows. “Restoring a woman’s smile has an incredibly powerful impact on her overall physical and mental health.”

Since launching in 2011, Project Restoring Smiles has treated more than 45 patients to more than $200,000 worth of complimentary dental services.

The different character traits female dentists exhibit, as seen in the team from Project Restoring Smiles, translate into the different approaches McKay and Quiñonez saw female and male dentists taking in clinical practice. They noted male dentists tend to use gloves, masks, and protective eyewear less frequently than female dentists, who reported being more concerned with infection control. Women also typically favour preventative measures, while male dentists are more likely to advocate significant restoration. The willingness that these women have to head off problems before they arise could have a significant impact on their patients and the entire dental industry, in fact.

Female dentists are also more likely to refer the patients to specialists rather than attempting to resolve patient problems themselves. McKay and Quiñonez stated 70.3 percent of female dentists have referred simple and complex surgical cases to specialists compared to just 49.5 percent of male dentists.

Female Dentists Come From Diverse Backgrounds

Female Dentists Come From Diverse BackgroundsVarious scientific studies acknowledge that diversity in any industry makes professionals more creative, more diligent, and more hard-working.

For that reason, the large number of female dental professionals that come from nations outside of North America is also notable.

Burnaby dentist Dr. Wise Tang hails from Hong Kong and offers her services in English, Mandarin, and Cantonese, and is the owner of two 123Dentist offices.

Dr. Roshanak Rahmanian received her Doctor of Dental Surgery in Iran before completing a two-year qualifying program at the University of Toronto to practice in Canada.

Today she works as a general dentist at the Lonsdale Dental Centre in North Vancouver.

Representation of Women in Dentistry Goes Beyond Dentists

Representation of Women in Dentistry Goes Beyond DentistsWhen assessing the impact of women in dentistry, it makes sense to analyze the number of practicing dentists. However, this doesn’t tell the entire story. Approximately 98 percent of Canada’s dental hygienists are women, along with 95 percent of its dental assistants. Both these roles feature in the top five female-dominated professions in Canada.

Women are also taking a growing role in leading dental practices. For example, 28 percent of 123Dentist clinic owners are women. Anecdotal evidence also suggests more women are specializing in dentistry.

While general dentistry remains popular, many female dentists say they see more of their peers pursuing roles in specialties like oral surgery and endodontics. Women like these continue to make strides in dental specialties and assert themselves in exciting new dental fields.

Dentistry Is Growing to Reflect What Women Want

Women in dentistry typically demand different things than their male colleagues. They often want time off to raise children and usually retire earlier. In his article “The 5 Most Dangerous Trends Facing Dentists and Their Families Today,” Evan Carmichael noted that male dentists typically work for 35 years, while female dentists usually work for 20 years in the profession. This statistic is bound to change since the ratio of women to men in the industry is continually changing, and will be interesting to observe over the coming decades.

Dentistry Is Growing to Reflect What Female Dentists WantAs more women take roles in dentistry, we are seeing dental practices create more flexible working environments that reflect the needs of women. The current crop of dentists encourages those of the future to continue striving for the working conditions and work-life balance they need to achieve success.

We surveyed a number of female dentists and below are some of their comments and advice for women considering becoming dentists.

“My advice for future women dentists would be to know yourself and how to manage the stress of being a perfectionist, which can be in the nature of those personalities that go into dentistry,” one respondent said. “It can be overwhelming to own a practice, and be a ‘perfect’ clinical dentist, ‘perfect’ employer, ‘perfect’ colleague, lifelong learner and ‘perfect’ mother and still juggle everything with the impossible standards we set for ourselves. We wear many hats.”

“Having a dental career while being a mom is tough,” another respondent said. “One should strive to balance her career and family life, but the drive is the influence one can give to each and every patient and it’s priceless.”

While juggling the demands of dentistry with home life can be challenging, our dentists are showing they can do it all with ease, all while bringing new elements and approaches to an established industry. Although this was once a male-dominated field, women and their successes have now become integral to dentistry in Canada and beyond.

So with all of that said, we’d like to wish you all a happy International Women’s Day!

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This content was originally published here.

‘So shocking:’ MU Dentistry student makes history as 1st African-American class president

MILWAUKEE — Dental tools in hand and teeth to work on is Chante Parker’s comfort zone. But being the first African-American class president for Marquette University’s School of Dentistry is still sinking in.

Chante Parker

“I’m the one that’s imprinting on history and it’s like, I never thought that,” said Parker.

Park has been class president since July of 2019 and serves as an ambassador for her class to create new initiatives for the dental school. She had no idea she’d be the first African-American to step into those shoes in the school’s 125 years of existence.

“I realize the magnitude of this opportunity, but it’s just so shocking to believe that it’s me,” Parker said.

Parker grew up in Atlanta and completed her undergraduate degree at The University of Miami, so she said moving to Milwaukee was a culture shock.

“It’s very segregated in where people live and where people thrive, and how the city runs itself,” said Parker. “I’m not used to that.”

Being hands-on helps Parker learn how to create beautiful smiles while she hopes to bring smiles to the community by setting an example.

“To help shift that dynamic and change the perspective and show that black people can do well, you can do anything that you want to do,” Parker said.

As Parker preps a crown, some might say she wears one herself as a catalyst for an inclusive community.

Marquette University School of Dentistry

“It made me feel like I had purpose in being here,” said Parker.

Parker will graduate in 2022. She hopes to open her own practice and offer free services to underprivileged communities.

This content was originally published here.

From Ancient Egypt to the Nazis: 16 Horrors of Dentistry Through the Centuries

Early man didn’t really have any tooth worries. Not only did the people in pre-agricultural societies not have any sugar or processed foods to worry about, the life expectancy was so low that you were often dead before tooth rot set in anyway. However, when mankind started to learn how to farm, tooth decay started getting real. Indeed, archaeologists have found evidence that people living more than 15,000 years ago were suffering from cavities. What’s more, they were also using flints to clean their teeth and to even knock rotting teeth out.

Shockingly, such primitive dentistry was to remain the norm for many centuries. While the people of ancient Egypt, Rome or Greece might have been pioneers in many fields, including maths, astronomy and even medicine, their knowledge of oral health was basic to say the least. And this approach to dental health continued right through the Middle Ages. In fact, it was only really with the Enlightenment that real, expert dentists started to emerge. But even then, treatments were carried out without any anaesthetics.

The history of dentistry, therefore, makes for some pretty tough reading. Going to the dentist could be bloody, gory, painful and often even fatal, as the below shows. So, here we present the history of dentistry, blood and all:

Simple bow drills were used to fix cavities more than 9,000 years ago. Ttamil.com.

Bow drills were used 9,000 years ago

Fear of the dentist’s drill is not a new phenomenon. In fact, archaeologists have discovered evidence that humans were facing the trauma of going under the drill some 9,000 years ago. Of course, the equipment used back them was far more primitive than today’s advanced tools. However, the general aim and method was the same – drilling into the tooth to address decay and prevent a cavity from growing any bigger.

The first evidence of ancient peoples using dental techniques goes as far back as 7,000BC. Archaeologists studying the ancient Indus civilization, who settled the Indus Valley between modern-day India and Pakistan, found bow drills they believe were used for primitive dental surgery. With the string of the bow pulled taught, the drill bit would go into the affected tooth and, it was hoped, drain all the infection out. Of course, all this was done slowly and carefully, and all without any anaesthetics to ease the considerable pain.

It’s widely assumed that these first dentists were actually primitive jewellers. During the ancient Indus civilization, jewellery was very popular and bow drills were used to bore holes in beads to make necklaces and bracelets. Since they had the necessary equipment, these beadmakers would also be employed as makeshift dental surgeons, though their excellent hand-eye coordination and precise technique would likely have made up for their lack of medical knowledge. And, of course, if these beadmakers were the first dentists, then their assistants would have been the first dental assistants. After all, at least two other people would have been required to hold the patient down during the painful procedure.

This content was originally published here.

Local music and art at Magic City Dentistry’s open house party on January 23

Sponsored

Magic City Dentistry
Photography by Ann Sydney Williamson on display at Magic City Dentistry (photo of photo by Nathan Watson)

Magic City Dentistry is launching their first party of 2020 with Botox specials, giveaways, Rock and Roll photography from Ann Sydney Williamson and a live music performance from Taylor Hollingsworth. The fun kicks off on January 23 at 4:30PM–you don’t want to miss it!

Part Dentistry, Part Art Gallery

Magic City Dentistry
Magic City Dentistry is conveniently located in the heart of downtown. Photo via Nathan Watson for Bham Now

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again–Magic City Dentistry has an atmosphere unlike any dentist office I’ve ever visited. For starters, every patient and employee is so friendly and outgoing. And there’s the fact that every examination room is outfitted with a TV–so you can catch up on your latest Netflix binge.

But my favorite part of visiting Magic City Dentistry is getting to see all of the art. In the past, Magic City Dentistry has displayed art from Lauren Strain, Sonia Summers, Eric Poland and many more. 

Magic City Dentistry’s Newest Exhibit

Magic City Dentistry
Photography by Ann Sydney Williamson on display at Magic City Dentistry. Photo via Nathan Watson for Bham Now

The latest artist to grace the walls is Ann Sydney Williamson, a local photographer.

Ann Sydney has been a photographer for 7 years. It all started when she was touring with bands and decided to start taking photos with her phone. She noticed that she had a knack for capturing captivating moments, so she picked up a fancy camera and began to teach herself photography.

Ann Sydney took this photo of her husband, the drummer of Lee Bains III & The Glory Fires, in 2014. Photo via Ann Sydney Williamson

“I started only shooting bands, and then I starting taking photos of my travels. I really like odd cultural events, so I just starting taking photos of them.”

Ann Sydney Williamson

Since then, Ann Sydney expanded her photography to her travels, life and adventures. But for this art opening, she’s going back to her roots by showing off her best photos of the rock and roll shows she’s attended throughout the years.

  • View her work: Website | Facebook | Instagram

The Fun Starts January 23

Magic City Dentistry
Ann Sydney and her husband figure out the best way to hang her framed photos. Photo via Nathan Watson for Bham Now
  • When: January 23, 4:30PM to 7PM
  • Where: Magic City Dentistry, 2117 1st Ave N, Birmingham, AL 35203
  • What: An art opening for Ann Sydney Williamson

Just like the opening of Sonia Summer’s exhibit in August, Magic City Dentistry is hosting a gala for the art opening. Here are the top 4 things I’m looking forward to!

1. Meet the Artist & Buy Her Work

Ann Sydney Williamson and her husband, Blake (the drummer for Lee Bains III & The Glory Fires) will be at the party to answer any questions you have about her art. Plus, during the gala (or any time you visit Magic City Dentistry), you can purchase any print or framed photo that you like.

  • Prints: $75
  • Framed photographs: $150

PS: If you see a print that you’d like framed, Ann Sydney can arrange to have it framed for you.

2. Eat, Drink and Socialize

This art gala is the perfect opportunity to make new friends in Birmingham. There will be food, wine and beer from Trimtab Brewing.

3. See a Free Show by Taylor Hollingsworth

Based on this photo, you can tell that Taylor’s music has psychedelic roots! Photo via Taylor Hollingsworth

While you enjoy Ann Sydney’s photographs, Birmingham native musician Taylor Hollingsworth will be putting on a free show! Taylor writes, plays, and records his own music, and has released nine solo albums. In addition to his solo work, Taylor has toured with Conor Oberst and the Mystic Valley Band, Dead Fingers, Maria Taylor, Monsieur Jeffrey Evans and his Southern Ace’s and 

“Taylor’s writing gets right to the heart. His music is a mix of psychedelic, punk and blues–but with an old country spin. I have personally seen people cry upon hearing some of his songs and I have too!”

Kristye Dixon, Practice Development Manager

4. Get Entered to Win Big

Ann Sydney took this photo of Henry “Gip” Gipson of Gip’s Place. Photo courtesy of Magic City Dentistry

Each guest gets an entry for several exciting raffle items, such as a free Teeth Whitening from Magic City Dentistry and a free framed photograph from Ann Sydney Williamson.

Plus, Magic City Dentistry is offering their botox units at a discount for one night only. At the gala, you can purchase botox for $10 per unit–regularly $13 per unit!

The best part? This entire event is FREE and open to the public.

  • Address: 2117 1st Ave N, Birmingham, AL 35203
  • Hours: 7AM-5PM Monday and Wednesday | 8AM-6PM Tuesday | 8AM-4PM Thursday | 8AM-1PM Friday
  • Contact: 205.238.6800 | Website | Facebook | Instagram

This art gala for Ann Sydney Williamson is the perfect chance to find out what Magic City Dentistry is all about. From celebrating and supporting local artists, to providing a warm, comfortable environment for their guests, you can get the full experience on January 23.

So come out and enjoy art, music, and good company at Magic City Dentistry.

Tag us on social media @bhamnow with your favorite photograph at Magic City Dentistry!

Sponsored by:

The post Local music and art at Magic City Dentistry’s open house party on January 23 appeared first on Bham Now.

This content was originally published here.

Dentistry Lacks Sufficient Research to Substantiate Many Procedures

The Trouble With Dentistry

by Dr. Joseph Mercola
Mercola.com

According to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, 92% of adults aged 20 to 64 have had cavities in their permanent teeth. Interestingly, Caucasian adults and those living in families with higher incomes have had more decay, or at least have been treated for more cavities. Adults in the same age range have an average of 3.28 decayed or missing permanent teeth.

While many believe water fluoridation is an effective way of preventing tooth decay, supporting facts are just not there. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) data reported by the Fluoride Action Network, the U.S., which provides fluoridated water to 74.6% of community water systems, has higher rates of tooth decay than many countries that do not fluoridate their water, including Denmark, the Netherlands, Belgium and Sweden.

If fluoridation were effective, you would expect to see higher numbers of cavities in communities without fluoridated water and the number of cavities to decline when fluoride is introduced. Instead, demographic studies have demonstrated fluoridated water has little to do with cavity prevention.,,

Instead, caries often follow demineralization of the tooth triggered by acids formed during bacterial fermentation of dietary sugars. Just as depression is not triggered by a lack of Prozac, dental caries are not caused by a lack of fluoride — a neurotoxic compound that has no biological benefits. Excess dietary sugar is the most significant factor driving dental decay.

Dentistry Lacks Sufficient Research to Substantiate Many Procedures

The American Dental Association (ADA) claims the Code on Dental Procedures and Nomenclature (CDT) as their intellectual property. In 2000, the code was named as a HIPAA standard code set, and any electronic dental claim must use these procedural codes. According to the ADA, there are times when a code is not available and dentists are encouraged to request additions and revisions.

This process is different from the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) based on data developed by WHO, which copyrights the information and publishes the classification. An adaptation of the classification for use in the U.S. is completed by National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), and must conform to WHO conventions.

Oftentimes when expensive surgery or a regimen of pills is recommended, most seek a second opinion. However, the same is not true when you’re sitting in the dentist chair. A Cochrane review of dental studies finds many of the standard dental and cosmetic treatments are not substantiated by research.

For instance, they could not find enough evidence to support or oppose the surgical removal of asymptomatic impacted wisdom teeth, to prove if antibiotic prophylaxis is effective or ineffective in those at risk for bacterial endocarditis before a dental procedure, and only three trials were found analyzing the efficacy of filling cavities in primary teeth, none of which were conclusive.

In other words, much of the research in the field of dentistry is sadly lacking. While the recommendations may be appropriate, they may also not be, and many simply do not have adequate evidenced-based science to warrant their use.

As noted in recent article in The Atlantic, “[W]hat limited data we have don’t clearly indicate whether it’s better to repair a root-canaled tooth with a crown or a filling.” Derek Richards, director of the Centre for Evidence-Based Dentistry at the University of Dundee, commented on the gaping hole of evidence in the field of dentistry:

“The body of evidence for dentistry is disappointing. Dentists tend to want to treat or intervene. They are more akin to surgeons than they are to physicians. We suffer a little from that. Everybody keeps fiddling with stuff, trying out the newest thing, but they don’t test them properly in a good-quality trial.”

Anatomy of a Tooth

According to the Academy of General Dentistry, at least 40 million adults in the U.S. suffer from sensitive teeth. They describe the sensitivity as being caused by the movement of fluid within tiny tubes located in the dentin, or the layer of tissue found beneath the hard enamel. When the fluid reaches the nerve, it causes irritation and pain.

These tiny tubules are exposed when your enamel is worn down or the gums have receded. This increases your risk of experiencing pain while eating or drinking hot or cold foods. The Cleveland Clinic lists some factors that may lead to sensitivity, including brushing too hard, gum disease, cracked teeth, teeth grinding and acidic foods.

The tubules branch throughout the tooth and are different between peripheral and the inner aspects. The branching pattern reveals an intricate and profuse system crisscrossing the intertubular dentin.

Studies demonstrate anaerobic bacteria and gram positive rods, as well as a large number of bacterial species, may be found within this tubule system in those suffering periodontal disease. The researchers concluded:

“It seems clear that, in more than half of the infected roots, bacteria are present in the deep dentin close to the cementum and that anaerobic culturing of dentin is more sensitive than histology to detect these bacteria.”

Further research finds a necrotic dental pulp may develop unnoticed for years and the course of the disease is modulated by the variance of the microbiota in the root canal space and the capacity of the individual’s immune system.

Another study found the environment of the deep layers of the endodontic dental area is anaerobic, favoring the growth of anaerobes, including Lactobacillus, Streptococcus and Propionibacterium.

Avoid Root Canals Whenever Possible

Root canals are not your only option. Teeth are similar to other systems in your body as they require blood supply, venous drainage and nerve innervations. Teeth that have undergone a root canal are dead and typically become a source of chronic bacterial toxicity in your body. In one study published in 2010, the authors wrote:

“Root canal therapy has been practiced ever since 1928 and the success rate has tremendously increased over the years owing to various advancements in the field. One main reason is the complete understanding of the microbiology involved in the endodontic pathology.”

If any other organ in your body lost blood supply and lymphatic drainage it would die. Your physician would recommend it being removed so necrosis and bacteria would not kill you. But dead teeth are commonly left in your mouth. Anaerobic bacteria thrive in your dentin tubes and the blood supply surrounding the dead teeth drains the toxicity, allowing it to spread throughout your body.

This toxicity may lead to a number of diseases, including autoimmune diseases, cancer, irritable bowel disease and depression. Dr. George Meinig has a unique perspective on the underlying dangers of root canal therapy as he was one of the founding members of the American Association of Endodontists, root canal specialists.

When he wasn’t filling canals, he was teaching the technique to dentist across the country. After spending decades practicing endodontics, he retired and began pouring over the detailed research of Dr. Weston Price. He was shocked to find valid documentation of systemic illnesses resulting from the latent infections lingering in the filled canals.

The result was his book “Root Canal Cover Up.” In an interview with me, Meinig describes the result of Price’s research findings and credible reasons why you should avoid a root canal. Price’s work demonstrated that many who suffered chronic degenerative diseases could trace the origins to root canals.

The most frequently reported conditions were heart and circulatory diseases. The next most common diseases were of the joints and those of the brain and nervous system. Meinig assumes all root filled teeth harbor bacteria and other infective agents, but not everyone is made ill since those with strong immune systems may be able to prevent bacterial colonies from taking hold.

Oral Health Inextricably Linked to Your Overall Health

However, Meinig cautions that over time, most who have undergone a root canal seem to develop some type of systemic symptoms. If you choose to have a dead tooth removed, just pulling the tooth is not enough. Price found bacteria in tissue and bone adjacent to the tooth’s root. Consequently, Meinig developed a protocol he describes in his book to ensure no bacterial growth is left.

Historically, dentistry and medicine were separated. It’s unfortunate how many fail to fully appreciate the influence oral health has on overall health. The delicate balance of bacteria in your mouth is as important to your health as your gut microbiome.

Periodontal disease, which affects the soft tissue and bone, is triggered by an increase in Porphyromonas gingivalis, a bacteria that impairs your immune response. Dental caries have been causally linked to Streptococcus mutans. In turn, your oral health impacts the rest of your body and they have a significant impact on your risk of disease.

For example, Type 2 diabetes and periodontal disease are strongly connected, as are cardiovascular disease and periodontal disease. Research has demonstrated failing to brush on a daily basis may increase your risk of dementia by 22 to 65%, compared to brushing three times a day, and good oral hygiene may lower your risk of pneumonia by 40%.

When the bacteria causing tooth decay and gum disease enter your circulatory system, your body increases the release of C-reactive protein known to lead to many chronic diseases. Therefore it’s only common sense to pay attention to your oral health, and develop good habits that support your oral microbiome.

Seek Out a Biological Dentist for Care

One step toward achieving good oral health is to seek out a biological dentist, also known as a holistic or environmental dentist. These doctors operate according to the belief system that your teeth are an integral part of your body and, hence, your overall health. They recognize oral and dental health have a major influence on disease and any medical treatment takes this into account.

While I recommend using a biological dentist for all your dental needs, if you’re considering the removal of dental amalgams, it’s absolutely essential. Most conventional dentists are unaware of the dangers involved and lack the experience to remove amalgam fillings without placing your health at risk in the process. Another strategy biological dentist use is to check the compatibility of dental materials with your body.

What’s in Your Silver Fillings?

The silver fillings in your mouth are dental amalgam. As noted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), dental amalgam has been used to fill cavities for more than 150 years in hundreds of millions of patients around the world.

Amalgam is a mixture of metals consisting of elemental mercury and a powdered alloy of silver, tin and copper, 50% of which is elemental mercury by weight. The FDA also admits amalgam fillings release low levels of mercury in vapor form that may be inhaled and absorbed in your lungs.

Mercury is a neurotoxin. How your health is affected will depend on the form of mercury, the amount in the exposure and the age at which you’re exposed. Additionally, how long the exposure lasts and your underlying health will determine symptoms you may experience.

Symptoms of prolonged exposure to elemental mercury may include emotional changes, insomnia, headaches and poor performance on mental function tests. In 2009, the FDA issued a final rule on dental amalgams reclassifying mercury from a class I (least risk) device to class II (more risk) and designated a special controls guidance document for dental amalgam.

The WHO found mercury exposure, even in small amounts, may trigger serious health concerns and can have toxic effects on lungs and kidneys, as well as the nervous, digestive and immune systems. It is considered one of the top 10 chemicals or groups of chemicals of major public health concern.

Daily Care May Protect Oral Health

As Meinig discussed in our interview, the only scientifically-proven way to prevent tooth decay is through nutrition. He related how in Price’s travels he found 14 cultural pockets of natives who had no access to “civilization” and ate no refined foods.

While their diets varied, they all ate whole, unrefined foods. Without access to tooth brushes, floss, fluoridated water or toothpaste, each group were almost all 100% free of caries.

For a discussion of how you may integrate holistic and preventive strategies, such as making your own toothpaste, flossing guidelines, and information on oil pulling and nutritional supplements to support your oral health, see my previous article, “Dental Dedication: Improve Your Oral Health.”

What’s Lurking in Your Silver Fillings?

It’s estimated that 75 percent of Americans are ignorant about that fact that amalgam fillings are actually 50 percent mercury, and this is no accident. The American Dental Association (ADA) popularized the deceptive term “silver fillings” so consumers would think amalgam is made mainly of silver when actually it has twice as much mercury as silver.

Mercury is an incredibly potent neurotoxin; it doesn’t take much to cause serious damage because it’s an absolute poison. If you were to take the amount of mercury in a typical thermometer and put it in a small lake, that lake would be closed down due to environmental hazards.

Yet, amounts much higher than that are readily put into your mouth if you receive a “silver” amalgam dental filling, as the majority of material in the filling is actually mercury. Download your free copy of “Measurably Misleading” and learn how the FDA and dental industry are misleading consumers and why that’s bad for American families and our planet.

Help Support Mercury-Free Dentistry

We believe in inspiring progress — and nowhere is the progress more evident than the work of Consumers for Dental Choice and its Campaign for Mercury-Free Dentistry. So consider donating your funds where you know it will get results.

Consumers for Dental Choice takes the Holistic Approach to Advocacy. You wouldn’t go to a traditional dentist who uses mercury amalgam fillings. So why would you go to a traditional activist to fight for mercury-free dentistry? That’s why so many people, including myself, support Consumers for Dental Choice’s holistic approach to advocacy.

Resources to Help You Find a Biological Dentist

The following organizations can help you to find a mercury-free, biological dentist:

Let’s Help Consumers for Dental Choice Get the Funding They Deserve

Consumers for Dental Choice and its leader Charlie Brown continue their full-court-press campaign to bring mercury-free dentistry to the U.S. and worldwide. If you wish to stay informed, I encourage you to follow them on Facebook; if you wish to stay informed by receiving their announcements, you can sign up by .

You can help stop dental mercury today! Please consider donating to Consumers for Dental Choice, a nonprofit organization dedicated to advocating mercury-free dentistry.

Read the full article at Mercola.com.

See Also:

Did Pennsylvania Mom Who Stood Up to Dental Bullying Uncover Massive Pediatric Dental Fraud Nationwide?

References

 National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, Dental Caries in Adults 20 to 64

 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Community Water Fluoridation

 Fluoride Action Network, Tooth Decay in F versus NF Countries

 European Journal of Oral Science, 1996; 104(4):452

 Caries Research, 1993; 27: 201

 Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, 2002; doi.org/10.1034/j.1600-0528.2000.028005382.x

 World Health Organization, Fluoride in Drinking Water

 American Dental Association, Frequent Questions Regarding Dental Provision Codes

 American Dental Association, Code on Dental Procedures and Nomenclature

 World Health Organization, Classifications

 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ICD-10-CM

 Cochrane, Priority Reviews

 Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, June 13, 2012

 Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, October 9, 2013

 Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, April 15, 2009

  The Atlantic, May 2019

 Academy of General Dentistry, Why Are My Teeth Sensitive?

 Cleveland Clinic Tooth Sensitivity: Possible Causes

 Archives of Dental Biology, 1996;41(5)

 Journal of Endodontics, 2001;27(2)

 Virulence, 2015;6(3)

 International Endodontic Journal, 1990;23(1)

 Journal of Conservative Dentistry, 2010;13(4)

 American Association of Endodontists, AAE History

 Frontiers in Microbiology, 2016;7:53

 Microbiology Reviews, 1986;50(4):353

 Diabetologia, 2012;55(1):21

 Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology, 2010;14(3):148

 Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 2012; doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-5415.2012.04064.x

 Annals of Periodontology, 2003;8(1):54

 Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Disease, 1993;25(2):207

 Dr. Weil, Holistic and Biological Dentistry

 U.S. Food and Drug Administration, About Dental Amalgam Fillings

 Environmental Protection Agency, Healthy Effects of Exposure to Mercury

This content was originally published here.

Quick Bytes: Space Grease, Horse Dentistry, and Lab-Grown Brains

Grease Me Up, Scotty

The Milky Way is one of the most magnificent sights in the universe. In addition to housing our very own solar system, the Milky Way is extremely large, as it has been discovered that an entire trip across the galaxy would take, at light speed, a total of 200,000 years. Well, that’s not the only recent discovery about the Milky Way as, much like a Double Quarter Pounder with Cheese, it is large, beautiful, and covered in grease.

But how much of this “space grease” is out there gunking up the beauty of the universe? According to a recently published paper in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, it’s at the very least known that there’s enough grease that your spaceship would need a trip to the carwash.

Thankfully, due to the solar wind, experts don’t expect the grease to have any major effects on our own solar system. This is great news, as this solar system already has plenty enough grease in our restaurants, meals, and arteries.

Curing Colt Cavities

While we may always dread that occasional trip to the dentist, the practice of oral care has definitely improved over its long history. Dentistry itself dates back to 2600 BC, where the first-ever reference to dental work was made. However, we know what you’re thinking, “But when did horse dentistry get started?” Admit it, that’s exactly what you were thinking.

According to researchers, horse dentistry may have dated back to 3,200 years ago, when Mongolian pastoralists attempted to remove teeth from the animals in order to utilize metal bits. The researchers, who published their findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, also made a connection between this discovery and the dawn of mounted battles and longer travel in certain Asian civilizations soon after.

You have to admit, it’s not often that you get the opportunity to read a story that teaches you the early history of equestrian dental hygiene. Well, now you have something to talk about at your next dinner party.

If I Could Only Grow a Brain…

To study the brains of Neanderthals, researchers have mainly focused on analyzing fossilized skulls to infer what they might have contained. However, a team at the University of California, San Diego is employing a new tactic: growing Neanderthal minibrains in a lab. At the UCSD “Imagination and Human Evolution” conference, geneticist Alysson Muotri, Ph.D., revealed that his team had used stem cells containing Neanderthal DNA and the genome editor CRISPR to create pea-sized lumps that could mimic the brain’s cortex.

For the experiment, the team focused on the protein-coding gene NOVA1, which likely helped produce more than 100 proteins in Neanderthal brains. It takes months to grow a minibrain from Neanderthal stem cells and the results have not yet been officially published. However, Muotri and his team think that the study could shed light on the links between the human and Neanderthal brain. Plus, many academics hope that this new brain-growing tactic could help Scarecrow achieve his dream of having a brain.

This content was originally published here.

3000-year-old sawn-off tooth may be the earliest evidence of horse dentistry

Horses like these continue to be the center of Mongolia’s economy.

William Taylor

3000-year-old sawn-off tooth may be the earliest evidence of horse dentistry

Three thousand years ago, a horse in Mongolia had a toothache that was probably making it—and its owner—miserable. So the owner tried to help, by attempting to saw the painful top off the offending incisor. The procedure is among the earliest evidence of veterinary dentistry in the world, according to a new study, and the practices that flowed from it may have helped horses transform human civilization.

“It’s a great study,” says Robin Bendrey, an archaeologist and ancient horse expert at the University of Edinburgh who was not involved in the work. As horses became more important, he says, nomadic herders “are investing greater effort in understanding how to care for them.”

William Taylor, an archaeologist at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany, first came across the strange sawn tooth in the collections of the National Museum of Mongolia in Ulaanbaatar. “I could not for the life of me muster an explanation,” he says.

He turned to his Mongolian colleagues, archaeologists Jamsranjav Bayarsaikhan and Tumurbaatar Tuvshinjargal, who grew up in the Mongolian countryside and have firsthand knowledge of traditional horse husbandry. The group concluded that the sawn tooth was an early, if inefficient, form of dentistry. The tooth had grown in crooked and was likely painful, but rather than pulling the incisor out completely, the notch shows that the ancient herder tried to cut its top off to restore a flat chewing surface, the team reports today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (The procedure may not have worked, as the herder only made it halfway through the tooth. Shortly after, the horse was sacrificed and ritually buried.)

Together with another cut tooth from around the same time, the discovery shows that about 2000 years after horses were first domesticated, people were still figuring out the best way to take care of their teeth using basic stone tools.

The notch in this horse incisor, which had grown in crooked, shows that a herder tried to saw part of it off.

W. Taylor et al.; Origins of Equine Dentistry, PNAS, (2018)

Over time, horse dental care in Mongolia became much more systematic, Taylor and colleagues found. In the 3000-year-old horse skulls the team studied, many horses still had their “wolf teeth”—small, pointy teeth that grow in the space between the teeth in the front of a horse’s mouth and those in their cheeks. Wolf teeth are an evolutionary relic, and horses no longer use them for chewing; many horses don’t even develop them.

In today’s horses, when wolf teeth do grow in, they occupy some of the space where the bit sits. The contact between the tooth and the metal riding equipment can cause pain and tooth damage, so both Western veterinarians and Mongolian herders routinely remove these teeth.

But back when ancient herders were making their first forays into horse dentistry, bits were still made of leather. With softer equipment, early domesticated horses could keep their wolf teeth.

Beginning around 750 B.C.E., however, nearly all of the horses Taylor’s group examined were missing their wolf teeth. In many of the skulls, they could see a healed hole where a wolf tooth had been pulled out. That shift coincides with the adoption of bronze and iron bits in Mongolia, which gave riders much greater control over their horses—but meant that wolf teeth had to go.

“They’re adapting to new ways of riding and new ways of using the horse,” says Alan Outram, an archaeologist at the University of Exeter in the United Kingdom who studies horse domestication and wasn’t involved in the new research. “People innovated fairly quickly.”

 Without such innovations, world history might look a lot different. Metal bits enabled herders to use horses in war and for long distance travel, shaping Mongolia and its nomadic cultures in ways that ultimately led to the rise of Genghis Khan’s mounted army and the Mongol Empire that controlled most of Eurasia in the 13th century. “Horses absolutely transformed Mongolia into a cultural and economic center of the world,” Taylor says.

This content was originally published here.

HENRY the Dentist is bringing quality dentistry to the workplace – MedCity News

It turns out that reluctance in visiting the dentist isn’t just limited to children. According to a report from the American Dental Association, more than half of adults with private dental insurance haven’t visited the dentist in over a year.

Regular dental care helps avoid more serious and costly dental procedures down the road and can highlight potential conditions like cardiovascular disease or diabetes.

New Providence, New Jersey-based HENRY the Dentist was designed to overcome the general hesitance of going to the dentist by providing services using its fleet of RV-sized mobile practices to allow employees to get dental care at their worksite.

Since its launch in 2017, the startup has signed up more than 70 customers including major enterprises like Merck, ADP and Vonage.

The startup’s mobile practices have three chairs and can see 24 patients a day. HENRY works with its client to determine the length of stay and how many times the company returns throughout the year.

The 40-person company has been boosted with a $10 million in funding led by Forerunner Ventures to expand its service offerings across New Jersey and Pennsylvania and in metro areas like New York City and Atlanta. San Francisco-based Forerunner has backed a number of successful consumer brands including Warby Parker, Jet and Hotel Tonight. 

HENRY CEO and co-founder Justin Joffe said the company was formed to update the staid image associated with dentistry and create a new Uber-like experience for patients. Joffe started the company with his wife Alex after seeing how the largely fragmented industry has failed to update its customer experience in line with other segments.

Mobile dental models have been around for a while, but Joffe pointed to his company’s differentiator as offering a full medical team as part of its mobile practice. Every HENRY mobile clinic includes a dentist, a dental assistant, two dental hygienists and one office manager.

Besides performing dental checkups, teeth cleanings and teeth whitenings, the mobile practice has the ability to fill crowns, custom fit night guards and even perform quick turnaround impressions and orthodontics work through its physical clinic.

The founding team’s experience building consumer brands has also helped them develop an updated and more comfortable experience for patients.

Instead of flipping through outdated magazines in the waiting room, patients make their appointments online and are greeted to a visit where they are outfitted with Bose headphones, have their choice of entertainment options and enjoy a massage-featured exam chair.

The company’s expansion is based around a hub-and-spoke model, with mobile clinics built around a physical brick-and-mortar location that provides enhanced specialty services and lab work. Currently the company has one physical practice in New Jersey, but is working on opening its second location in Pennsylvania.

HENRY dentists are salaried, which Joffe says incentivises clinicians to provide better and more preventive care. The company also works to ensure the same dental team is matched up with the same companies for greater continuity of care.

HENRY’s services are offered at no additional charge to its employer clients. By working with insurers like Aetna, Cigna Delta Dental – who are looking to boost utilization – the company ensures that its providers are in-network with major plans.

Ashley Thomas, a wellness coordinator at real estate company Realogy, helped institute HENRY’s services at a former employer and plans to do the same at her current company. 

“My primary dentist’s office felt like it was stuck in the 1970s,” Thomas said. “HENRY felt shiny, clean, high-tech, convenient and 21st century. I mean, I don’t know many dentists offices that let you watch TV while getting your teeth cleaned.”

Thomas added that HENRY helped her team with the outreach necessary to get employees engaged with the mobile dentistry service.

Joffe said the company is hoping to build on its strong momentum into 2020, with a planned Series B funding round to fuel expansion into five more states. Joffe’s growth plan calls for a presence in 15 to 20 states in three years as the company looks to develop national relationships with its existing employer clients.

As it expands, Joffe said the company is experimenting with new delivery methods for its services, including HENRY in the Boardroom, which would bring clinicians directly into the office for scheduled practice hours.

“We works with these great brands and companies and they often have phenomenal dental plans,” Joffe said. “Everyone needs preventive care and we’re proud to build a company that increases access to care and improves the experience for both patients and providers.”

Picture: HENRY the Dentist

This content was originally published here.

UNHCR - Turkey scholarship lets star Syrian student pursue dentistry dream

Since she arrived in Turkey six years ago, Syrian refugee Sidra has mastered a new language, worked in a factory to support her family and graduated top of her year in high school.

Her breakthrough came when she won a university scholarship. She is now in her second year of a dentistry degree, and fulfilling a life-long dream

“I am very passionate about education,” said the 21-year-old, who fled war-ravaged Aleppo with her family in 2013. “My dream was to go to university, and I studied very hard to achieve this dream.”

Her achievement reflects a single-minded determination to continue her education, even when it seemed she might not get the chance. She missed her final year of high school in Aleppo when fighting forced the closure of local schools, and when she first arrived in Turkey, she lacked the paperwork needed to enroll.

“The day I went back to school was beautiful.”

Unable to study, she took a full-time job packaging goods in a medical supplies factory while teaching herself Turkish in her time off from books and YouTube videos. A year later, when she secured the refugee documentation needed to resume her education, she vowed to make the most of it.

“The day I went back to school was beautiful,” she said. “The worst thing about war is that it destroys children’s futures,” she continued. “If children don’t continue their education, they won’t be able to give back to society.”

After graduating from high school top of her class with an overall mark of 98 per cent, Sidra then went one better to score 99 per cent in her university entrance exams. The results helped her to secure a vital scholarship from the Presidency for Turks Abroad and Related Communities (YTB).

While tuition fees at Turkish state universities have been waived for Syrian students, the scholarship provides Sidra with monthly support, enabling her to concentrate on her studies. Without this support she says she would not have been able to study her preferred subject of dentistry due to the extra cost of buying equipment such as cosmetic teeth to practice her skills.

Sidra practices her dentistry skills at home while her younger sister Isra looks on. © UNHCR/Diego Ibarra Sánchez
Sidra attends a practical lesson at Istanbul University, where she is studying dentistry. © UNHCR/Diego Ibarra Sánchez
Sidra stands outside her home in Canda Sok on the outskirts of Istanbul. © UNHCR/Diego Ibarra Sánchez
Sidra spends time with a friend on the historical Galata Bridge in Istanbul. © UNHCR/Diego Ibarra Sánchez
Once a week, Sidra teaches classical Arabic to Malak, an 8-year-old Turkish girl, at her home in Istanbul. © UNHCR/Diego Ibarra Sánchez

“Without the scholarship, I would have had to choose a different major, different to dentistry, and to work to cover my university expenses,” she explained.

Sidra is one of around 33,000 Syrian refugee students currently attending university in Turkey. The country is host to 3.68 million registered Syrian refugees, making it the largest refugee hosting country in the world.

Since the beginning of the Syria crisis, YTB has provided 5,341 scholarships to Syrian university students, while a further 2,284 have received scholarships from humanitarian partners. This includes more than 820 scholarships provided by UNHCR – the UN Refugee Agency – under its DAFI programme.

Access to education is crucial to the self-reliance of refugees. It is also central to the development of the communities that have welcomed them, and the prosperity of their own countries once conditions are in place to allow them to return home.

Enrolment rates in education among refugees currently lag far behind the global average, and the gap increases with age. At secondary school level, only 24 per cent of refugee children are currently enrolled compared with 84 per cent of children globally, with the figure dropping to just 3 per cent in higher education compared with a worldwide average of 37 per cent.

In Turkey, this average has been raised to close to 6 per cent thanks to the priority attached to education, including higher education for refugees.

Efforts to boost access and funding for refugees in quality education will be one of the topics of discussion at the Global Refugee Forum, a high-level event to be held in Geneva from 17-18 December.

Turkey is a co-convenor of the event, which will bring together governments, international organizations, local authorities, civil society, the private sector, host community members and refugees themselves. The event will look at ways of easing the burden of hosting refugees on local communities, boosting refugee self-help and reliance, and increasing opportunities for resettlement.

“Successful people can support the country they’re living in.”

Sidra is convinced that education holds the key to her own future success, and is determined to live up to the nickname she has earned among her fellow students.

“People call me ‘çalışkan kız’ which means: ‘the girl who studies a lot’,” she explained. “With education we can fight war, unemployment and illiteracy. With education we can reach all our goals in life.”

“Successful people can support the country they’re living in,” she continued. “Turkey has given me a lot of facilities, and it honors me that one day I can give back to its people and be an active member [of society], to work and practice dentistry with their support. I take pride in this.”

This content was originally published here.

The John Fornetti Dental Center Presents Dentistry For Our Vets 2018

Iron Mountain, MI – The John Fornetti Dental Center will present Dentistry For Our Vets on Saturday, November 10, 2018. Dentistry For Our Vets provides free dental care to our veterans in need.

Dr. John and Dr. Dan Fornetti, along with their team of employees, volunteers and sponsors will be hosting their 5th annual Dentistry For Our Vets on Saturday, November 10, 2018. Those over age 18 in need of dental care will be able to choose between one free extraction, filling or hygiene cleaning. Registration begins at 8:00 a.m. and patients will be seen on a first come, first served basis until 3:00 p.m.

The media is invited to join the many volunteers and patients to spread free smiles across Iron Mountain through Dentistry For Our Vets at The John Fornetti Dental Center. We are turning our parking lot into an outdoor waiting room, with a heated waiting area and burn barrels, but please remember to bundle up and stay warm.

91% of U.S. veterans are ineligible for dental benefits. Dr. John Fornetti of Iron Mountain, MI, thinks as Americans, we can do better. In response, Dr. John started Dentistry For Our Vets. The John Fornetti Dental Center’s 2017 event was able to serve 58 veterans, providing over 162 procedures, and over $20,000 in services donated.

Dentistry For Our Vets will be held at The John Fornetti Dental Center, located at 100 S. Stephenson Avenue, Iron Mountain, MI. from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Anyone interested in volunteering their services for the event can find more information by calling (906) 774-0100 or visiting us on the web here and on Facebook.

This content was originally published here.

Pasco Man Accused of Practicing Dentistry Without License

WESLEY CHAPEL, Fla. — Pasco County Sheriff’s Office deputies arrested Jose Mas-Fernandez, 33, for allegedly practicing dentistry without a license.

“Why people would go to someone like this, we don’t know. We can only speculate, but it is against the law. You have to have a license,” said PSO Community Relations Director Kevin Doll. “You have to be licensed by the state, and this individual obviously did not have that.” 

The arrest was the result of a joint investigation between the Sheriff’s Office and the Florida Department of Health.

Authorities said Mas-Fernandez offered to pull teeth for both an undercover detective and an undercover health department investigator. He reportedly offered to provide antibiotics for $150 and numbing medication for $20.

Inside Mas-Fernandez’s apartment, investigators found dental equipment and medication. Doll said he told detectives the supplies came from Cuba.

PSO’s documents state that after his arrest, Mas-Fernandez admitted to performing dental work, like teeth cleanings and extractions, out of his home. It’s unclear how many people he may have treated.

“Any medical doctor who’s not licensed working on your body can be very dangerous,” said Doll. “That’s why we suggest anybody who did see this individual to go to a real dentist and have their teeth checked out.”

Doll said Mas-Fernandez told detectives he worked as a dental assistant at Land O’ Lakes Dental Care. The office was closed Friday.

According to Brad Dalton, press secretary for the state health department, the DOH received 1,051 complaints of unlicensed activity during the fiscal year of 2018-2019. The department issued 593 cease-and-desist orders during that time.

Dalton said of those, 67 complaints and 36 cease and desist orders were related to the practice of dentistry. The DOH said Mas-Fernandez received one of those cease and desist orders.

The DOH reminds the public that being treated by an unlicensed medical professional could result in injury, disease, or death. License information for health care practitioners can be found at: www.flhealthsource.gov/ula.

This content was originally published here.

Spirit of the Entrepreneur: Valdosta Family Dentistry | Local News | valdostadailytimes.com

VALDOSTA — Being an entrepreneur isn’t always easy and everyone does it a little differently.

Some open online stores, while others open brick-and-mortar storefronts.

Some go all in and invest their lives into a new venture, while others start a new business as something to do on the side. Regardless of the type, entrepreneurs help drive the local economy.

Larry Black, owner and dentist at Valdosta Family Dentistry, didn’t begin his career in dentistry until he was in his mid-30s.

At 17, he left Valdosta and joined the Navy for six years.

He worked as an electronic technician doing satellite communications and cryptography.

After leaving the military as an employee, he worked as a civilian contractor for the Navy for six years doing similar work.

The work required Black to travel regularly, and he eventually decided he wanted to settle down.

“We traveled about 11 months out of the year,” he said. “We traveled anywhere the Navy was having trouble with communications equipment. I decided that I was ready to quit traveling and started back to school.”

Being from Valdosta, Black returned to attend Valdosta State University to earn a biology degree.

After three years of undergraduate work and a degree in hand, Black had been introduced to the world of dentistry through Dr. Greg Morris, he said.

So, Black attended the Medical College of Georgia for four years to to become a dentist.

By the time he attended MCG, he was the third oldest student in his cohort. Black said being a non-traditional student was beneficial to him.

“I was one of those people who could not have done and focused on school at 18,” he said. “Part of the reason I went into the Navy was I knew that about myself.

“When I came back from the Navy and started school, it was much easier for me having already had life experience and improved time-management skills. Knowing where I wanted to be and how to get there helped me jump through the hoops or check off the boxes to get there.

“I knew what I wanted and was wiling to work harder for it and put in the time.”

After graduation, Black came back to Valdosta in 2004 and opened his first office, Quitman Family Dentistry in Quitman.

“When I got out and looked at a place to set up my office, there was still plenty of room for more dentists in Valdosta, and having grown up here, I felt that it would be easier to start up a business in my hometown,” he said.

In 2009, Black opened an office in Valdosta.

“When I was working in Quitman Family Dentistry, myself and Dr. Eric Castor felt there would be a need for an emergency dental clinic in Valdosta,” he said. “We spent a year with this office as an emergency-only clinic.”

Based on customer requests, Black expanded to a full-service dentist office in 2010.

After being in practice for almost 15 years, he said the hardest part has been operating the business side.

“Running the business is probably the toughest part of what I do,” he said. “The toughest part for most dentists is we tend to be very technical. We enjoy working with our hands and working with people. And dental school prepares you for all the knowledge you need to do dentistry.

“The tough thing is they don’t prepare you to run a small business. When you come out of school and you have to learn about tax structure and accounting.”

Black said he leaned on his late wife, Dana Black, when he first opened his business.

“I got into it thinking you get out, put your sign on the door and you go to work,” he said.

While he worked with the clients, Dana learned how to run the business for him.

“She was a big part of why we were able to do what we did,” he said.

Dana passed in 2017.

As for advice for new or potential business owners, Black suggests taking a few years to learn about the selected industry. He also recommends utilizing the small business resources available.

“If you are going to open up your own business, understand that business,” he said. “Most people have an idea of what a business is but they haven’t worked in it before. They don’t have an idea of how it works. Take a few years and start from the bottom and work in a few positions.

“Then go and take some accounting classes and business classes either through (Wiregrass Georgia Technical College) or the (University of Georgia Small Business Development Center at Valdosta State University) that’s here in Valdosta because both of those guys helped me out after I got started.”

Valdosta Family Dentistry, 2935 N. Ashley St., Suite 130, is open open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Quitman Family Dentistry is open Tuesday and Thursday. For more information, call (229) 333-8484.

Jason Smith is a reporter at The Valdosta Daily Times. He can be contacted at 229-244-3400 ext.1257.

This content was originally published here.

The Importance of Geriatric Dentistry

As you grow older, it’s important to keep up with your teeth. Perhaps you or your companions don’t see the need to go to the dentist, but the impact of good dentistry on your teeth and overall health is undeniable.

Here, we’ll explore all you should know about geriatric dentistry.

Why Do Older Adults Not Go to the Dentist?

With retirement, spending time with family, and other life events in full swing, it can be difficult to prioritize your oral health.

Here are some specific reasons why seniors don’t visit the dentist:

  • Cost: Seniors don’t have workplace insurance coverage. Programs like Medicaid offer limited coverage for dental procedures. Some seniors don’t view paying out-of-pocket as a realistic option.
  • Misinformation: Some seniors believe that they don’t need to go to the dentist because they don’t have teeth. This is simply not true. At a visit, you can be fitted for dentures and get exams to screen for signs of oral cancer.

How Your Oral Health Affects You

Your oral health is important in so many ways. Some of the top reasons include:

Contributing to Your Bodily Health

Your oral health doesn’t just benefit your teeth and gums. Poor oral health can lead to:

  • Diabetes
  • Heart disease
  • Pneumonia

Neglecting to visit a dentist can lead to specific oral issues like:

  • An uneven jawbone
  • Root decay
  • Darkened or otherwise discolored teeth
  • Gum disease

Giving You Confidence

There is an aesthetic appeal to good oral health.

A white, aligned smile is self-assuring. It can help you feel confident and allow you to more fully enjoy social interactions.

Ceramic crowns, veneers, and other types of cosmetic dentistry from Calgary, for example, all help seniors smile with confidence. More standard services, like teeth whitening and cleaning, help preserve your smile for life.

How to Go on a Budget

If the cost of going to the dentist is daunting, use these tips for going to the dentist on a budget.

Limit Unnecessary Visits

At home, be sure to care for your teeth. Take these preventative measures:

  • Brush twice daily
  • Floss daily
  • If you have extra-sensitive teeth, use a gentle toothpaste.
  • Avoid foods that may cause tooth damage, like hard candy or acidic fruits

Even though skipping out on visits may save you money temporarily, it isn’t a financially-savvy habit. Attending regular visits prevents the need for costly treatments down the road.

Review Your Options

Look up different dental offices around you. They will vary in price based on the services they offer and the areas where they operate. Consider driving to a nearby area with a lower cost of living. The extra minutes it takes to drive to a different location can save you money, especially on costly procedures.

Look for Coupons

Some offices offer special coupons or deals for new customers. Look actively on saving sites like Groupon or browse your local newspaper.

Go to a Dental Hygienist

In many areas, you can see a dental hygienist without a dentist present. These types of visits are significantly less expensive than regular office visits. Be sure to research the regulations in your area. Some areas restrict what a hygienist can treat.

Ask for a Discount

If you’ve been going to the same office for years, consider asking for a discount. Most dental offices are willing to negotiate a price, especially on a costly procedure. Do so before you receive treatment. You can also request treatment to be performed in different stages. This way, you have time in-between visits to save money to pay for your treatment.

Visit Your Dentist!

Managing your oral health as a senior can be intimidating. As with other adults, seniors should have their teeth cleaned twice a year. You should also get X-rays at least once a year to ensure there are no underlying problems with your teeth or gums.

Take command of your oral health as a senior!

The post The Importance of Geriatric Dentistry appeared first on LivingBetter50.

This content was originally published here.

BYU students promote women in dentistry

From left to right: Lauren Olsen, Eliza Butcher, Nadia Valentin, Kendra Law, Tessa Hadley, Cyerra Davis and Haram Kim smile at the opening social of the BYU Women in Dentistry committee last week. (Ty Mullen)

Recent BYU graduate Lauren Olsen wanted to be a dentist since she was 4 years old, but while at BYU, her advisor influenced her to pursue a different career path. She ended up graduating in 2018 with a degree in public health.

“He looked at me and was like ‘You know, if you’re a dentist, you’ll have a really hard time being a mom,’” Olsen said, describing the conversation that led her to change majors. “I left and just cried a lot.”

Lauren Olsen dressed as a dentist with her father. Olsen said she knew she wanted to be a dentist at a very young age. (Lauren Olsen)

Olsen said a public health internship in Cambodia helped her realize she needed to return to her roots and study dentistry. While there, she met a young girl with an infected tooth and a swollen face who couldn’t speak. There were no dentists available in the area to assist her.

“I was flying home the next day and thought ‘I didn’t do anything for her,’ and it’s one of my biggest regrets,” Olsen said. “When I got home, I started having a lot of little experiences that reminded me that I wanted to be a dentist all along.”

Olsen said once she got home, she asked family members if they knew any women in dentistry. She eventually learned about Jennifer Klonkle, who is a mother and works one day out of the week as a dentist in Arizona.

Dentists like Klonkle inspired Olsen to find a way to share their stories with other aspiring female dentists.

“If only other girls at BYU could see this,” Olsen said. “I know these nice, normal, smart girls are dentists and moms and whatever they want to be.”

Despite the small number of female dentists in Utah, Olsen established the Women in Dentistry committee at BYU to inform others that there are women who have successfully forged a career in dentistry.

Only four percent of dentists in Utah are women, while 28.9 percent of dentists are female nationwide, according to a 2017 study by the Utah Medical Education Council.

Women in Dentistry president Kendra Law said the group has grown from six to about 30 members. Law said she believes the numbers have increased because of the committee’s support for students who would otherwise be discouraged from a career in dentistry.

“It just helps to have this support group of women who are all trying to reach the same goal,” Law said. “Even when some people are saying, ‘No, you can’t do it,’ we can turn to each other, and we have a good network of people supporting and pushing us to all reach the same dream.”

The first six members of the Women in Dentistry club (from left): Alejandra Garcia, Lauren Olsen, Tess Hadley, Emily Coenen, Kendra Law and Emma Kohl. Club president Kendra Law said the number of members has grown since then. (Lauren Olsen)

The Women in Dentistry committee volunteers for organizations like Community Health Connect to help youth from low-income Utah County families receive the dental care they need. Members of the committee participate in a fluoride varnish program where they check children’s teeth and refer severe cases to dentists who offer dental care free of charge.

“They get a chance to see and understand that there are kids that really don’t have a toothbrush or can’t take care of themselves,” said Julie Francis, Dental Assistant Program Coordinator of Mountainland Technical College. “They get that feeling to help people and become more involved in the community.”

Olsen said she is expanding the Women in Dentistry committee to reach female dental assistants who are juniors and seniors in high school.

“Ninety percent of the high school students we talked to signed up to learn more,” Olsen said.  “It taught me when you teach young girls about their potential, they want to do big things.”

Olsen is now completing prerequisites at UVU so she can apply for dental school next summer. She is also creating a website where young women can observe the examples of female dentists who have successfully balanced their career and other interests.

“So that there will never be a girl again who comes to BYU and gets told ‘No, you can’t be a mom and a dentist. You can’t be a Young Women’s president and a dentist,’” Olsen said. “We’ll have a database of interviews showing that you can and that women all over the country are doing it.”

For updates about BYU Women in Dentistry club meetings, follow them on Facebook and Instagram.

This content was originally published here.

For Sale: Jane Austen’s Wince-Inducing Descriptions of 19th-Century Dentistry

After dinner one evening in September 1813, Jane Austen sat down to write a letter to her sister Cassandra. Austen, who had published Pride and Prejudice earlier that year, had much to report from the home front. She had accompanied three nieces and her brother Edward to a Wedgewood china shop, she wrote, where they’d perused the wares. Other news was less pleasant: Earlier that day, they’d been to the dentist for an hour of “sharp hasty screams.”

“The poor Girls & their Teeth!” Austen wrote. “Lizzy’s were filed & lamented over again & poor Marianne had two taken out after all.” The dentist—a Mr. Spence, who could have been one of several Spences working as dentists at the time—had even gone after her niece Fanny’s teeth, though they had seemed in decent shape. “Pretty as they are,” Austen recounted, the dentist had “found something to do them, putting in gold & talking gravely.” That didn’t sit right with Austen, who wrote that the tool-happy man “must be a Lover of Teeth & Money & Mischief.” Austen remarked that she “would not have had him look at mine for a shilling a tooth & double it.” Her note, which is going under the hammer at Bonhams on October 23, is an intriguing (if squirm-inducing) dispatch from an era of grisly dental work.

At the time Austen penned the letter, dentistry was still painfully unstandardized. Treatments varied widely, and troublesome teeth were often yanked out by people from all sorts of professions. “In London and large towns, surgeons were available to pull out teeth, but elsewhere, apothecaries, quack tooth-drawers, and even blacksmiths might oblige,” write historians Roy Adkins and Lesley Adkins in Jane Austen’s England: Daily Life in the Georgian and Regency Periods.

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Austen’s reference to filings in the letter “shows the diversity of practice because of the lack of scientific understanding of the causes of decay,” explains Rachel Bairsto, head of museum services at the British Dental Association Museum, in an email. There was a lot of disagreement about whether various interventions would offer the patient relief, or just plunge them deeper into pain. Though filing had historically been used to smooth out uneven teeth, Bairsto adds, some practitioners recommended it as a way to prevent cavities. Others disagreed, arguing that it “made more space to trap food.” In any event, Bairsto writes, “overzealous filing could make the teeth more sensitive.”

Even where tooth-pullers and oral hygiene tools were available—and it was mostly the wealthy who could access them—they weren’t necessarily a good idea. “Early toothbrushes with their horsehair bristles often caused more problems than they prevented,” writes medical historian Lindsey Fitzharris in The Guardian. “Toothpastes or powders made from pulverised charcoal, chalk, brick or salt were more harmful than helpful.” Eighteenth- and 19-century animal-hair bristles were breeding grounds for bacteria, which could make any existing mouth trouble even gnarlier.

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Though holes in teeth were sometimes patched, fillings “were not commonly practiced, as they were expensive and often didn’t last long,” Bairsto writes. Extraction was the more common, and decidedly miserable, route. An extraction was often accomplished with the help of a dental key (also called a tooth key), which Bairsto describes as “rather a fearsome-looking instrument.” It’s a nightmarish claw-and-rod contraption, and it would have been wielded without anesthetic. Bleeding and infection often followed.

Once the infected incisors or meddlesome molars were out, they would sometimes be replaced with dentures, which could be made from walrus or hippo ivory, porcelain, or teeth removed from other unfortunate people, living or dead. (When the Battle of Waterloo felled thousands of soldiers, “clients back in England were happy to wear dentures made from the teeth of fit young men killed in battle, which became known as ‘Waterloo teeth,’ or, more coyly, ‘Waterloo ivory,’” Adkins and Adkins note.) Dentures weren’t without their drawbacks, Bairsto writes: They had a tendency to stink and rot in the mouth, “and the use of a fan was required to waft the stench.”

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By the middle of the 19th century, the world’s first dental school had opened in Baltimore, Maryland, reported, and across the pond, Queen Victoria had helped make it fashionable to own a personal set of dental tools. Her scalers—tools used to scrape off gunk—were outfitted with mother-of-pearl handles and gold detailing. That was of no help to Austen.

Because oral hygiene was expensive, Bairsto writes, “it is unclear” whether the Austens routinely used toothbrushes. For the most part, writes historian and Austen biographer Lucy Worsley in Jane Austen at Home, “Jane and her family simply had to put up with the small aches and ailments of life.” Even so, references to dentistry—and the anxiety that a visit to a dentist might incite—appear in some of the writer’s fiction. In Emma, Harriet has “a tooth amiss,” and is reported to appear a bit “out of spirits.” That’s “perfectly natural,” readers are told, “as there was a dentist to be consulted.” In Austen’s realm, even fictional characters knew that a visit to a dentist could sour an afternoon.

Janeites are a devoted bunch—the sight of her writing table, at the Jane Austen’s House Museum in Chawton, England, often prompts rapt reverence, or even tears—and the letter is likely to be catnip for her most enthusiastic reader-disciples. (Bonhams expects the letter to sell for somewhere between $80,000 and $120,000.) For everyone else, it’s a macabre memento from a time when the sharp end of a dentist’s tool was a place you really, truly did not want to be.

This content was originally published here.

Eagle News Online – Goel Family Dentistry moving location, changing name

The Goel Family Dentistry staff at a recent outing to Beak and Skiff Apple Orchards. (courtesy Goel Family Dentistry)

Goel Family Dentistry, which has been serving the Cazenovia community for the past decade, has announced some major changes coming up for its business, not the least of which is a move to a new building and a re-naming of the practice.

The change is really about expansion — the practice has hired a new dentist and a new hygienist, has 9,500 patients from all over the Cazenovia area, and needs more room for working and more room to grow, said Dr. Vikas Goel, owner of the practice currently located in the Atwell Mill building on Albany Street.

“We’re busting at the seams here,” Goel said. “I’m nervous, excited, everything. It’s a good move for us, and also for Cazenovia.”

Goel has purchased the former Pro-Tel building at 4 Chenango Street and is currently undertaking some upgrades and renovations to prepare for a move-in that he hopes will be in January. Pro-Tel owner Eric Burrell sold the building after he moved his offices to 95 Albany St.

An artist rendering of the new business sign for Creekside Dental, the new name for Goel Family Dentistry. (Courtesy Goel Family Dentistry)

Goel’s new offices will double his current footprint from 2,400 to 5,000 square feet, he said. Patients will enter from the parking area through the lower level of the Chenango Street building, where the reception and waiting room will be, then take an elevator upstairs to the clinical space where there will be 11 chairs for patients, he said.

Goel recently hired Dr. Tyler Maxwell, a graduate from Buffalo University, as the third dentist in the practice, joining Goel and Dr. Anna Romans. He also recently hired another hygienist.

“Right now, we have three doctors, five hygenists and six chairs — the math just doesn’t work anymore,” he said. “And it’s just time I get my own place.”

With the new building, more chairs and more staff, an increased number of appointment times will also open up for their patients, Goel said.

The new dental office will not only have a new address, but also a new name: Creekside Dental. Goel said that with three dentists now, to keep his name alone on the business was “not really fair.”

Goel Family Dentistry is currently located at 135 Albany St., but will soon be moving to its new location at 4 Chenango St. For more information, call 315-655-5885 or visit the website at doctorgoel.com.

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Jason Emerson is editor of the Cazenovia Republican and Eagle Bulletin newspapers.

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IU Dentistry serves smiles to Ronald McDonald House families

This past fall, our Indiana University School of Dentistry (IUSD) ASDA chapter partnered with our local Ronald McDonald House to serve families who are displaced while their seriously ill or injured child receives care at Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis. We helped provide home-cooked meals for families on a monthly basis, interacting with them and spreading information about our resources at IUSD, which is located across the street. These dinners also served as a time for the family members to share their child’s story and connect with other parents who may be going through similar experiences.

We established this programming because we recognized the need for volunteers at our local Ronald McDonald House, and with the facility being only a short walk away from the dental school, it became a no-brainer in terms of getting dental students and the dental school more involved.

One of the toughest parts of the dinners was hearing some of the heart-wrenching stories from the families. For example, one family had multiple other children at home over four hours away. We listened to how they balanced time between being with their child who was receiving treatment at Riley Hospital and tending to their other children at home. As a dental student, it is so easy to get caught up in the exams, crown preps and denture projects that we may forget about the hardships others are facing right in our backyard. Partnering with and serving at Ronald McDonald House taught us how to be a little kinder and more open to listening to and comforting those in need.

My experience at our dinners was always heart-warming and meaningful. Watching my fellow students come together in the kitchen to serve those away from their home for several weeks or even months allowed me to see how much can be accomplished when a group works together and how big of a difference just a warm meal can make.

It is important to continue outreach to displaced populations such as the families at the Ronald McDonald Houses. For children facing a serious medical crisis, nothing is scarier than not having family nearby for love and support. Ronald McDonald Houses provide places for families to call home so they can be near their child at little to no cost.

My advice for a student wanting to start their own outreach project for displaced populations is to tap into local resources to see how you can collaborate to give back. You can make an even bigger difference when multiple organizations come together united. In addition, be creative and optimistic, realizing that no matter how small or large the project is, ultimately, a difference is being made. This event has impacted my understanding of oral health by illustrating to me how without outreach events, those in the community who may need care the most might not know about it or receive it.

One thing I wish I’d known earlier about the event was how much the families at the Ronald McDonald House truly appreciated the meals and the interactions. I had no idea how meaningful this work would be, and I found that sometimes a parent just needed someone to listen to them. Participating in this event as a health care provider taught me how to truly get to know people in the community who are struggling in some of the most challenging aspects of life, having an ill or injured child. This event illustrated the importance of a group of volunteers coming together for a cause and making a difference in the lives of those displaced from their homes.

~Sydney Twiggs, Indiana ’21

ASDA thanks Colgate for their exclusive sponsorship of the National Outreach Initiative. This backing includes funding for the Dentistry in the Community Grant and free oral health care supplies to any chapter that requests them.

This content is sponsored and does not necessarily reflect the views of ASDA.

This content was originally published here.

Mentoring In Dentistry: Promoting Growth And Development – Oral Health Group

With September and the launch of a new school year, we inevitably begin to think about learning and education. When it comes to facilitating the learning and development of new healthcare professionals, mentoring is noted as being a key mechanism to accomplish this goal. While mentoring may not be as prevalent in dentistry as it is in other health professions, the principles and expected benefits are equally applicable and relevant.

The process involves the pairing of an experienced dentist, the mentor, with a less experienced dentist, the mentee, in order to help the latter attain professional goals and to progress throughout their careers. The mentor serves as a support person and facilitator for the mentee, with the goal of promoting professional development and growth of the mentee through the sharing of knowledge, information and perspectives.

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Mentoring relationships can be initiated formally or informally. Formal relationships may be facilitated or encouraged if working within a larger organization or as part of a professional association or group. In these scenarios, a new dentist is paired with a dentist willing and trained to act as a mentor as part of a formal and structured program with clear goals and objectives. Informal mentoring relationships are typically formed when a new dentist independently seeks out an experienced dentist to serve as a guide. These relationships tend to be less structured with variable objectives and outcomes.

Keys to successful mentoring

The success of any type of mentoring relies on a productive and functional relationship between mentor and mentee that is based upon reciprocal trust and respect. This is facilitated when mentors and mentees enter the relationship with clear expectations. The setting of ground rules is essential and requires a frank discussion to determine parameters around such things as communication, commitment, responsibility and timelines. Strong commitment between both parties is essential, and open and ongoing communication is required for success.  Mentoring is a two-way street and both the mentor and mentee have equally important roles to play.

Personal characteristics and traits also serve as key determinants of success. Good mentors exhibit qualities of openness, humility, patience and empathy. Mentors who offer the most are those who practice active listening, can be reflective and are able to serve as a professional role model and guide. It is not essential that a mentor be able to address every question or concern of the mentee, but rather is able to facilitate learning and growth by directing the mentee to the required tools and resources. Mentees who will gain the most from the experience are those who have a desire for learning, are eager to develop, enthusiastic, open-minded and receptive to feedback and guidance. An important skill to develop for mentees is critical reflection, as success of the experience requires an honest self-assessment of one’s learning and development needs.

Benefits of mentoring

Best practices of mentoring dictate that the mentor will guide the mentee in the creation of learning objectives that are required to achieve the desired professional development and growth. These objectives will serve as a starting point for discussions around the relationship and what it may entail. While a mentee may have an idea about where they want to go, it is the mentor’s role to guide and support the journey, or where appropriate, suggest alternate routes.

The benefits of mentoring include creating a sense of belonging, improving productivity, achieving goal clarity, increasing confidence and greater job satisfaction. Mentoring can be a rewarding experience not only for the mentor and mentee but also for the organization and profession by creating a positive climate and culture. A fruitful and effective mentoring relationship is a win for everyone involved. Dentists at all stages of their careers should consider becoming involved in mentoring. Whether as a mentor or mentee, the sharing of knowledge, wisdom and perspectives will provide a meaningful experience.

About the Author

Dr. Shawn Steele graduated from Western University with a Doctor of Dental Surgery degree in 2005 and entered into private practice. While continuing to practice dentistry, Dr. Steele earned a Juris Doctor degree and a Master of Education degree. He is an Assistant Professor at Schulich Dentistry, the City-wide-Chief of Dentistry for London Health Sciences Centre and St. Joseph’s Health Care London and continues to work in private practice. Dr. Steele serves as the Clinical Coach for dentalcorp’s Associate Development Program and is committed to supporting the development and growth of dentists and the dental profession.

This content was originally published here.

Overtreatment, Lax Scientific Standards Raise Concerns in Dentistry | Forum | Forum | KQED

Chances are a dentist has told you to floss more. But studies from the Cochrane Institute and the American Dental Association have found that many common oral health recommendations such as biannual cleanings, yearly x-rays and flossing have not been verified through scientific research. Forum discusses efforts to steer dentistry toward more evidence-based practices and we’ll talk about challenges facing the field, including charges that many dentists overtreat their patients.

Mentioned on Air:
The Truth About Dentistry (The Atlantic)

Joel White, distinguished professor in restorative dentistry, UCSF School of Dentistry; vice chair, Department of Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences

This content was originally published here.

Dentacoin Combines Forces with MobiDent to Promote Preventive Digital Dentistry

June 20th, 2018: We are beyond thrilled to announce our new partnership with MobiDent, an India-based company aimed at making in-home, prevention-oriented dental care accessible and affordable to everyone.

“MobiDent is attempting to create a new Ecosystem for dentistry by creating a new generation of dentists (called Digi Dentists), who are trained in home dental care at the MobiDent Academy for Digital Dentistry, empowered with Caddy Clinic and connected to families who can use our Digital Dentistry Revolution Platform to avail on-demand preventive dental care that is convenient, inexpensive and safe. Now if there is a currency available to all connected parties, why wouldn’t we use it?”, shares Vivek Madappa, Co-Founder at MobiDent.

MobiDent’s Caddy Clinic: “Dental Clinic in a Suitcase”
for Affordable & Accessible Dental Care

MobiDent was founded in January 2011 by Dr. Devaiah Mapangada and serial entrepreneur Vivek Madappa in Bangalore, India’s Silicon Valley. Its unique proposition is called Caddy Clinic, or “dental clinic in a suitcase” and it comprises a portable dental chair and dental instruments and equipment required for basic dental procedures.

Through its revolutionary mobile dental care services, MobiDent brings benefits to both patients and dentists. Patients receive regular dental care right at lower costs and without the unpleasant time-consuming visits in the dental offices. Practicing dentists have the opportunity to treat more patients and young professionals can start their career with lower risk and great savings compared to the investment needed for opening a conventional dental practice*. For the last 4 years the concept has attracted 40 dentists across India with 65 000 patients.

In 2016, MobiDent was placed among the Top 10 from 19,000 business ideas, participating in India’s largest entrepreneurship competition organized by The Economic Times & IIM-A. From the same 10 projects, MobiDent won the first prize awarded by the Royal Academy of Engineering, London.

* Unlike in conventional dentistry where founding a clinic typically costs upwards of Rs.8 lakh ($12,000), the MobiDent taxi model costs only Rs.75,000 ($1,125) and its van model – between Rs.1.5 lakh ($2,250) and Rs.3 lakh ($4,500). Source: www.knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu

Intelligent Prevention & Digital Technology:
Where MobiDent Aligns with Dentacoin

MobiDent also differs from traditional dentistry by its strong focus on preventive dental care, which reduces the chances for serious problems by 80-90%, and thus reduces the costs and pain, according to Dr. Devaiah Mapangada. On that note, MobiDent offers special annual packages for home services which include two home visits per year for a check-up, cleaning and polishing, as well as unlimited tele-consultations, a dental health report, and 10% off on any further treatment.

“This digitized, prevention-oriented, patient-centered approach towards dentistry is in complete alignment with the core mission of Dentacoin. We believe that our cooperation with MobiDent will help dentists achieve the needed higher efficiency while simultaneously dramatically improve patients’ access to preventive dental care,” comments Ali Hashem, Key Account Manager at Dentacoin Foundation.

Dentacoin (DCN) Implemented by MobiDent
for Payments & Rewards

“The moment I heard about Dentacoin, I was open to explore its potential. If the world is heading into a digital revolution, it is necessary to have a new, universal currency, which is not influenced by governments, countries and politics. A currency that can connect all of us digitally, ensuring trust and transparency”, explains Vivek Madappa, Co-Founder at MobiDent.

Now each purchase of Caddy Clinic (available on Indiegogo) will allow dentists to receive a 5% discount and claim their reward in Dentacoin, if they start using Dentacoin Trusted Reviews and accept DCN as a means of payment for their services.

In the upcoming months, MobiDent plans to release a mobile app to easily connect patients with dentists, where Dentacoin will also be implemented.

MobiDent in cooperation with Dentacoin sets a new direction in dentistry, focused on improving dental care and making it affordable through shifting the paradigm from “sick care” to patient-centered preventive dental care and utilizing the digital technology advantages. This partnership will also help expand the Dentacoin network, which currently consists of 4000+ dentists using our tools and thirty five clinics in 14 countries, accepting DCN as a means of payment for dental services. See all Dentacoin partner clinics

This content was originally published here.

‘Dental Therapists’ Filling Gaps In Rural Dentistry Care

AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — It can be hard to keep smiles healthy in rural areas, where dentists are few and far between and residents often are poor and lack dental coverage. Efforts to remedy the problem have produced varying degrees of success.

The biggest obstacle? Dentists.

Dozens of countries, such as New Zealand, use “dental therapists” — a step below a dentist, similar to a physician’s assistant or a nurse practitioner — to bring basic dental care to remote areas, often tribal reservations. But in the U.S., dentists and their powerful lobby have battled legislatures for years on the drive to allow therapists to practice.

Therapists can fill teeth, attach temporary crowns, and extract loose or diseased teeth, leaving more complicated procedures like root canals and reconstruction to dentists. But many dentists argue therapists lack the education and experience needed even to pull teeth.

“You might think extracting a tooth is very simple,” said Peter Larrabee, a retired dentist who teaches at the University of New England. “It can kill you if you’re not in the right hands. It doesn’t happen very often, but it happens enough.”

Dental therapists currently practice in only four states: on certain reservations and schools in Oregon through a pilot program; on reservations in Washington and Alaska; and for over 10 years in Minnesota, where they must work under the supervision of a dentist.

The tide is starting to turn, though.

Since December, Nevada, Connecticut, Michigan and New Mexico have passed laws authorizing dental therapists. Arizona passed a similar law last year, and governors in Idaho and Montana this spring signed laws allowing dental therapists on reservations.

Maine and Vermont have also passed such laws. And the Connecticut and Massachusetts chapters of the American Dental Association, the nation’s largest dental lobby, supported legislation in those states once it satisfied their concerns about safety. The Massachusetts proposal, not yet law, would require therapists to attain a master’s degree and temporarily work under a dentist’s supervision.

But the states looking to allow therapists must also find ways to train them. Only two states, Alaska and Minnesota, have educational programs, and they aren’t accredited. Minnesota’s program is the only one offering master’s degrees, a level of education that satisfies many opponents — dentists generally need a doctorate — but is also expensive.

“I would have to relocate to another state to go to school, and if you need to work and you still have a job, why would you do that?” said Cathy Kasprak, a dental hygienist who once hoped to become a therapist under Maine’s 2014 law.

Some dental therapists start out as hygienists, who generally hold a two-year degree, do cleanings and screenings, and offer patients general guidance on oral health. Some advocates of dental therapists argue they should need only the same level of education as a hygienist — a notion that horrifies many opponents.

Some lawmakers in Maine, which will require therapists to get a master’s from an accredited program, are optimistic about Vermont’s efforts to set up a dental therapy program with distance-learning options. It’s proposed for launch in fall 2021 at Vermont Technical College with the help of a $400,000 federal grant.

Nearly 58 million Americans struggle to afford and make the trip to dental appointments in thousands of communities short on dentists, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

One of the biggest benefits of dental therapists, proponents say, is that they can make preventive care easier to get by lightening the load of dentists, whose appointment slots are often stolen by complex procedures.

Even in states where therapists must practice in dental offices, like Minnesota, they can shorten travel times by opening slots for simple procedures closer to home, a small but growing body of evidence shows.

Christy Jo Fogarty, Minnesota’s first licensed advanced dental therapist, said the nonprofit children’s dental care organization she works for saves $40,000 to $50,000 a year by having her on staff instead of an additional dentist — and that’s not including the five other therapists on staff.

Dental therapists make $38 to $45 an hour in Minnesota, according to the Minnesota Dental Association. Dentists, meanwhile, average over $83 an hour, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

According to state law, at least half of Fogarty’s patients must be on governmental assistance or otherwise qualify as “underserved.” She has also achieved the level of “advanced” therapist, meaning she has practiced with at least 2,000 hours of supervision and can make outreach trips on her own, to places like Head Start programs and community centers.

“Why would you ever want to withhold these services from someone who was in need of it?” she said.

Ebyn Moss, 49, of Troy, Maine, went without dental appointments for seven years before breaking a tooth below the gum line in 2017.

Moss has since had four teeth pulled, a bridge installed, a root canal, two dental implants and seven cavities filled at a cost of $6,300, and expects to shell out another $5,000 in the next year — a bill Moss is paying off with a 19% interest credit card and $16,000 in annual income.

“That’s the cost of choosing to have teeth,” Moss said.

Now, Moss gets treated at a dental school in Portland — a two-hour drive for appointments that can last 3 1/2 hours.

A dental therapist nearby would have made preventive care easier in the first place, Moss said.

The ADA and its state chapters report spending over $3 million a year on lobbying overall, according to data from the National Institute on Money in Politics. The Maine chapter paid nearly $12,000 — a relatively hefty sum in a small state — to fight the 2014 law that spring.

Some opponents of dental therapists argue they create a segregated system that gives wealthy urbanites superior care and puts poor, rural residents on a lower tier. Dental groups in Nevada and Michigan had argued lawmakers should instead boost Medicaid reimbursement to encourage dentists to accept low-income patients.

Some see less noble reasons for opposition: competition and potential loss of profits.

“They’re afraid if dental therapists come in to take care of the poor, they’re going to compete for their patients,” said Frank Catalanotto, a dentistry professor at the University of Florida.

Despite signs of more openness, successes aren’t uniform. Legislation failed in North Dakota and Florida this spring. Bills are pending in Kansas, Massachusetts and Wisconsin, as well as Washington, where therapists could be authorized to practice outside reservations.

“Available data have yet to demonstrate that creating new midlevel workforce models significantly reduce rates of tooth decay or lower patient costs,” ADA President Jeffrey Cole said in an email.

But the recent authorization of dental therapists in so many states may indicate the lobby’s influence and the arguments of other opponents are beginning to lose power.

“There is no justification, no evidence to support their opposition to dental therapists,” said dental policy consultant Jay Friedman.

He and some cohorts suggest dental therapists may need only as much education as a hygienist and argue they shouldn’t be working primarily in clinics. Such rules don’t help vulnerable groups like poor children in rural schools, he said.

“It’s no longer a question of if dental therapists will be authorized in every state,” said Kristen Mizzi Angelone, manager of the Pew Charitable Trusts dental campaign, which has waged its own push for dental therapists. “At this point it’s really only a matter of when.”

(© Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

This content was originally published here.

La Jolla Dentistry: Dr. D’Angelo and team know the power of a smile – La Jolla Light

The dental trio of Dr. Joseph D’Angelo, Dr. Ashley Olson and Dr. Ryan Hoffman comprise one of the largest dental practices in La Jolla — in both number of dentists and office space.

Recently, they expanded their hours to make their comprehensive dentistry services more convenient for their patients. Now, the La Jolla Dentistry office is open Monday and Wednesday evenings, and also on Saturdays, which is quite unusual for a dental practice.

Dr. Ryan Hoffman, who joined the team almost two years ago, told the Light that accommodating the lives of their busy patients is important. “In addition to the technology and all the services we provide, the convenience of coming here is key for working families with children in school, or for college students with strict schedules.”

The D’Angelo, Olson, Hoffman dental office has been located at 1111 Torrey Pines Road since 2004, when Dr. D’Angelo ran a solo practice. “I started out with one or two treatment rooms and gradually doubled in size,” he said. “Then, we doubled again. We have 10 treatment rooms now, and we’ve increased the types of services we provide.”

He said the office is fully equipped to handle just about any dental concern — from implants to veneers, gum recontouring, cosmetic and restorative dentistry, and Invisalign treatments.

Dr. Olson, who joined Dr. D’Angelo seven years ago, noted: “We are continually evolving technology in our office so it gives us added tools to provide exceptional care.”

The philosophy of providing impeccable care permeates throughout the staff, and Dr. D’Angelo is proud of creating such a culture. The office space has a warm and welcoming feel and the treatment rooms have TVs in the ceiling and mounted on the wall.

Dr. Hoffman pointed out that more younger clients are coming in the door these days: “I’m seeing and hearing a lot more in terms of cosmetics, whether it’s Invisalign or veneers, or before-and-after products, because social media makes dentistry so accessible to many more people these days.”

Dr. D’Angelo added: “Every patient seems to have an understanding that they need to take care of their teeth, and fillings and crowns and cleanings are part of that. But I still say two-thirds of what we do is want-based. For the vast majority of people, even though they have regular dental needs, the things they want seem to take precedence over things they know they need.

“People have come to realize that a smile they feel comfortable with — and a smile they can share with other people — impacts everybody around them.”

He explained that patients aren’t accepting ugly removable appliances and bridges anymore, either, they want implants and Invisalign, and they want their teeth white. Those desires drive the practice, with 3,000 patients and more walking through the door each day.

All three dentists agree that it really all comes down to the power of a smile.

As Dr. Olson put it: “(A beautiful smile) improves your work life, your love life, and your sense of self-esteem.” Dr. Hoffman added that on a personal note, “I have friends who’ve never been in a serious relationship and they’ve invested in their smile and now they’re engaged! It’s not necessarily the smile that did that, but it’s the confidence that came from the smile that altered their personality.”

And that smile power is also reaching seniors. Dr. D’Angelo commented: “It’s amazing how many people in their 70s are still highly concerned about how their smile looks. When they feel confident about their smile it makes them feel younger, feel healthier, feel more engaged. We’re changing people’s lives. From that standpoint, what we do is incredibly rewarding.”

The La Jolla Dentistry office of Dr. Joseph D’Angelo, Dr. Ashley Olson and Dr. Ryan Hoffman at 1111 Torrey Pines Road, Suite 101 in La Jolla is a fee-for-service practice, which means it participates with all PPO plans as an out-of-network provider. (858) 459-6224. joethedentist.com

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Courtesy Photo
The reception area at La Jolla Dentistry, 1111 Torrey Pines Road, Suite 101, La Jolla. (858) 459-6224. joethedentist.com
The reception area at La Jolla Dentistry, 1111 Torrey Pines Road, Suite 101, La Jolla. (858) 459-6224. joethedentist.com (Courtesy Photo)

This content was originally published here.

SUNDAY SOLILOQUY: Front Porch Dentistry – it was the only way during the old days – Alabama Pioneers

Front Porch Dentistry

by

Shannon Hollon

I remember my grandmother(Pauline Campbell Bearden) telling me a story once when they were staying with her grandparents( Pappy and Grandma) during the Great Depression.

Dr. Charles Campbell (Pappy) served as the local country doctor for Fosters and surrounding Tuscaloosa county area for many years.

Dr. Charles M. Campbell MD 1867-1939

On this certain occasion she and her brother(HT Campbell) watched out the front window as Pappy pulled a neighbor(John Ed)teeth with nothing but forceps and a cane bottom chair.

She said John Ed would hold on to the chair and give a grunt with each tooth extraction.

Dr. Campbell’s only claim to fame is he delivered a local baby Lurleen Burns Wallace who became the first and only female Governor of Alabama…By the way he was payed a calf for his delivery services of the future governor.

is a collection of lost and forgotten stories about the people who discovered and initially settled in Alabama.

Some stories include:

  • The true story of the first Mardi Gras in America and where it took place
  • The Mississippi Bubble Burst – how it affected the settlers
  • Did you know that many people devoted to the Crown settled in Alabama –
  • Sophia McGillivray- what she did when she was nine months pregnant
  • Alabama had its first Interstate in the early days of settlement

See historical books by Donna R. Causey


By (author):  Donna R Causey

List Price: $12.97 USD
New From: $12.97 USD In Stock

About Shannon Hollon

Shannon Hollon lives in McCalla Alabama graduated from McAdory High School and the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Served 9 years in the US Navy Seabees with one tour in Afghanistan.Currently employed with US Steel and serving on the board of directors for the West Jefferson County Historical Society. http://wjchs.com/

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This content was originally published here.

Biological Dental Hygiene: A Whole Body Approach to Oral Health – International Academy of Biological Dentistry and Medicine

By Carol Wells, RDH

dental scalingThink of a visit with your usual dental hygienist, and you probably think: Yeah, I’ll get my teeth cleaned and a little lecture about flossing, and that’s it. Every appointment is just like another – though each patient’s dental needs are not.

Fortunately, there are growing numbers of hygienists who think outside this box. Free from its confines, we can take a “whole body systems” approach to oral and overall health.

We call this Biological Dental Hygiene.

As a biological dental hygienist, I’m concerned with how the mouth affects the body and how the body affects the mouth. Each patient’s treatment plan is unique, customized to their personal oral-systemic health situation and needs.

What Makes a Biological Hygiene Appointment Different

Conventional dentistry has a pretty set plan for how a hygiene appointment should go:

Things go a bit differently at a Biological Hygiene appointment. For one, we start by talking with you outside of the operatory. We want to know

In other words, we want the big picture before we move on to the operatory.

Though each biological dental hygienist may work a little differently, I always start by taking your blood pressure and giving a blood glucose test. (There’s a strong relationship between diabetes and gum disease!) I also screen for head and neck cancer.

phase contrast microscopeIf any x-rays are needed, we take them – digitally, to minimize radiation exposure. (Some also provide homeopathics to counter the effects of radiation.) I also take intra-oral photos of your mouth and then look at a sample of your subgingival plaque with a phase contrast microscope, to get a glimpse of the health of your oral microbiome.

You get to see this in real time, too, observing pathogens – “bad bugs” that may be wreaking havoc with your health. When you do, it raises an obvious question: “How do I get rid of them?” You can see the infection for yourself.

We know that infection produces inflammation not just in the mouth but throughout your body. With the phase contrast microscope, you can see its cause – and have a better understanding of how your teeth, gums and the bone that supports their teeth are affected by these disease-related bacteria.

The biggest difference between this and a conventional dental visit, though, is the conversation we have with you. We’re not there to lecture you on flossing. Instead, together we explore a set of factors that play a big role in both oral and systemic health, identifying your challenges and creating a plan for conquering them.

These factors are summed up nicely in an acronym: HONEST AGE.

H – HYGIENE
O – OCCLUSION
N – NUTRITION
E – EXERCISE
S – STRESS
T – TOBACCO
A – AGE
G – GENETICS
E – EXERCISE/ EXPERIENCE

Let’s break down what these mean:

Hygiene: How does the way you brush your teeth impact the health of your teeth, gums, and body? Do you floss? Do your gums bleed when you brush or floss? How many times a day do you brush and floss? How effective are you?

Occlusion: How do your teeth fit together? Which teeth are affecting your bite relationship? How does this affect your mouth? Are there areas that are hard to reach?

Nutrition: Is your diet well balanced? What can you do to improve it?

Exercise: Are you getting enough physical activity? What can you do to get more of it into each day?

Stress: How do you handle stress? How would you rate your stress level on a scale of 1 to 10, where 10 is “maxed out” and 1 is “pretty mellow”? What can you do to lower that number?

Tobacco: Do you smoke or chew? How much is too much? Do you want to quit?

Age: Are you having any difficulties with mobility and dexterity as you age? Are there other, easier ways to do what you need to get done?

Genetics: Are you predisposed to certain illnesses? How do the ones that affect you affect your oral health?

Experience: Do negative dental experiences in your past keep you from seeing your dentist or hygienist regularly? Are you able to take care of yourself in the environment you live in?

Talking about these points in an open, honest, and nonjudgmental way empowers you to take charge of your oral and overall health. The info we uncover and share becomes the basis of a game plan for improving both.

After this strategizing, we’ll have you swish a disclosing solution in your mouth that will highlight any plaque on your teeth. (Dental plaque is invisible to the naked eye.) You’ll be able to see where you’ve been cleaning effectively, as well as areas you’ve been missing with brush and floss. I’ll take an intra-oral picture of this, as well, so we can compare it to results at your next visit. That way, we can track your progress.

And so you can progress, I’ll give you a mirror to look in as we review home care techniques. Most patients don’t realize how hard it can be to remove mature dental plaque. So I ask you to show me your brushing technique so I can advise on what you can do to get better at removing those soft deposits of bacteria. We may review flossing technique, as well.

interdental brushAnd I may suggest other tools you can incorporate into your home care routine to get better results – for instance, oral irrigators, interproximal/interdental (“proxy”) brushes, rubber tips, power brushes, sulcus brushes, and more.

Once we’re done with that, I’ll ask you to rinse with a fluoride-free, alcohol-free rinse in preparation for your cleaning. Before scaling – scraping the biofilm from your teeth – I’ll irrigate with ozonated water or use a subgingival laser (i.e., a laser that goes below your gumline) to reduce the bacterial load in the pockets (sulci) that flank each of your teeth. This lessens the bacterial cascade into the body that can happen during a deep cleaning.

I then scale the teeth to remove both hard and soft deposits (calculus and plaque, respectively). If I’m using an ultrasonic scaler, I’ll use ozonated water in it to further eliminate harmful bacteria. Afterwards, I’ll irrigate again with ozonated water and then polish your teeth with a fluoride-free, organic prophy paste, followed by a good flossing.

Your next appointment is then booked based not on some predetermined schedule but your actual needs.

Another biological dental hygienist may do these things in a different order or in a different way, but all of us take into account the whole body picture with respect to your oral health and opt for the least invasive nontoxic ways of providing the care you need.

YOU Take an Active Role

Conventional dentistry trains patients to be relatively passive in their care. The dentist and hygienist are the ones who “do things.” The patient is the one “done to.”

We want to bring about an end to what I call “the Yes Syndrome” – where patients agree with whatever the hygienist or dentist says, just to get on with the cleaning so they can get out of the dental chair and on with the rest of their day’s business.

In the biological model, though, we expect you to be engaged in your own treatment plan, as well as your home care routine. We want you to be involved in your own oral and overall health.

After all, it’s YOUR mouth we’re working on.

This content was originally published here.

Dentacoin Goes Beyond Dentistry: East Tremont Medical Center Joins the Dentacoin Partner Network

August 9th, 2018: Following this week’s signing of Dr. Gupta, inventor of PerioQ, we are happy to announce that East Tremont Medical Center, based in Bronx, NY, USA has begun accepting Dentacoin as a means Read more…

This content was originally published here.