7 Facts About Orthodontics | American Association of Orthodontists

Whether you call the process “braces,” “orthodontics,” or simply straightening your teeth, these 7 facts about orthodontics – the very first recognized specialty within the dental profession – may surprise you.

1. The word “orthodontics” is of Greek origin.

“Ortho” means straight or correct. “Dont” (not to be confused with “don’t”) means tooth. Put it all together and “orthodontics” means straight teeth.

2. People have had crooked teeth for eons.

Crooked teeth have been around since the time of Neanderthal man. Archeologists have found Egyptian mummies with crude metal bands wrapped around teeth. Hippocrates wrote about “irregularities” of the teeth around 400 BCE* – he meant misaligned teeth and jaws.

About 2,100 years later, a French dentist named Pierre Fauchard wrote about an orthodontic appliance in his 1728 landmark book on dentistry, The Surgeon Dentist: A Treatise on the Teeth. He described the bandeau, a piece of horseshoe-shaped precious metal which was literally tied to teeth to align them.*

3. Orthodontics became the first dental specialty in 1900.

Edward H. Angle founded the specialty. He was the first orthodontist: the first member of the dental profession to limit his practice to orthodontics only – moving teeth and aligning jaws. Angle established what is now the American Association of Orthodontists, which admits only orthodontists as members.

4. Gold was the metal of choice for braces circa 1900.

Gold is malleable, so it was easy to shape it into an orthodontic appliance. Because gold is malleable, it stretches easily. Consequently, patients had to see their orthodontist frequently for adjustments that kept treatment on track.

5. Teeth move in response to pressure over time.

Some pressure is beneficial, however, some is harmful. Actions like thumb-sucking or swallowing in an abnormal way generate damaging pressure. Teeth can be pushed out of place; bone can be distorted.

Orthodontists use appliances like braces or aligners to apply a constant, gentle pressure on teeth to guide them into their ideal positions.

6. Teeth can move because bone breaks down and rebuilds.

Cells called “osteoclasts” break down bone. “Osteoblast” cells rebuild bone. The process is called “bone remodeling.” A balanced diet helps support bone remodeling. Feed your bones!

7. Orthodontic treatment is a professional service.

It’s not a commodity or a product. The type of “appliance” used to move teeth is nothing more than a tool in the hands of the expert. Each tool has its uses, but not every tool is right for every job. A saw and a paring knife both cut, but you wouldn’t use a saw to slice an apple. (We hope not, anyway!)

A Partnership for Success

Orthodontic treatment is a partnership between the patient and the orthodontist. While the orthodontist provides the expertise, treatment plan and appliances to straighten teeth and align jaws, it’s the patient who’s the key to success.

The patient commits to following the orthodontist’s instructions on brushing and flossing, watching what they eat and drink, and wearing rubber bands (if prescribed). Most importantly, the patient commits to keeping scheduled appointments with the orthodontist. Teeth and jaws can move in the right directions and on schedule when the patient takes an active part in their treatment.

AAO orthodontists are ready to partner with you to align your teeth and jaws for a healthy and beautiful smile.

When you choose an AAO orthodontist for orthodontic treatment, you can be assured that you have selected a highly skilled specialist. Orthodontists are experts in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics – properly aligning teeth and jaws – and possess the skills and experience to give you your best smile. Locate AAO orthodontists through Find an Orthodontist at aaoinfo.org.

This content was originally published here.

Long-time orthodontist inspires former patient to follow in his steps

BLUEFIELD, Va. — Dr. Dean Evans, who has served the Bluefield, Va. community for 37 years by providing orthodontic treatment to both children and adults, is now in the transitional process of passing his practice on to Dr. Tyler Crowe, a former patient. 

Evans, who’s father was a dentist, grew up in Welch before moving to Princeton in 6th grade. 

After deciding on orthodontics as a profession he went on to attend Concord College and West Virginia University where he then attended the School of Dentistry and completed his orthodontic residency program. Directly out of his residency, he and his wife spent three years in Alaska with the Air Force. Afterward, he returned to the Bluefield area where he began practicing orthodontics. 

“It’s the most fun practice of dentistry,” Evans said. “Orthodontics is just fun. I love the work, I love the kids, I love the adults.”

Crowe said he was Evans’ patient roughly 15 years ago and that Evans is who ultimately inspired him to become an orthodontist.

“After coming here and getting my braces off and just the whole experience I just wanted to be able to provide that experience to other kids,” Crowe said. “The years that you have braces are very impressionable years. Just that impression that you can have. I know what it did for me and how I felt personally about myself through orthodontic treatment, so I wanted to be able to have an impact on other kids in that way.”

According to both Crowe and Evans, they proceeded to stay in touch through the years as Crowe applied to dental school and orthodontics residency where he too graduated from West Virginia University.

As Crowe neared the end of his residency they began discussing his future and what opportunities were ahead locally. 

“To be quite frank, I’m not ready to stop practicing. In my mind I was always focused on another five to 10 more years, and then Dr. Crowe came by and he asked if I would be interested in selling the practice,” Evans said. “So I started thinking about it, and say in five years, I want to practice five or 10 more years, and I put out my for sale sign, I may not get anybody half the quality or half the character that Dr. Crowe is.”

According to Evans the final deciding point came when Crowe advised him that he would keep the full staff – which he says is a rare move by new doctors.

In April, Evans disclosed the exciting news with his patients where he shared that his job is more of a calling he never took lightly and he believes Crowe will ensure optimal orthodontic care to all patients. 

The outpouring of love to Evans by his patients thus included their welcoming of Crowe in May as the two began working together in anticipation for Evans’ retirement. According to Evans, this is to secure Crowe is comfortable with the diagnosis and treatment plans and that the patients are likewise comfortable with Crowe. Evans plans to stay a minimum of 60 days or longer based on the comfort level by all parties involved.

“It was important to both of us that this be smooth and the patients feel comfortable with me. So as we plotted it out, we wanted to make sure they had the opportunity to see both of us at the same time. That way it wouldn’t feel so abrupt to anyone,” Crowe said. 

Evans has put optimal trust in Crowe.

“He’s very focused. He’s very detailed for perfection, and as a perfectionist, he’s a perfectionist like I am, it drives you crazy to try to get perfection. It’s just so hard to do that, but he’s very much like that,’’ Evans said of Crowe. “He has a good eye for detail. He’s very very gentle. He’s got good hands. He’s got good patient communication skills.”

Crowe says the transition thus far has been relatively easy as he considers his relationship with Evans to be a friendship unlike the experience of many business transitions. Crowe has also received a positive response from the patients and families.

“I do want to reiterate just the importance that Dr. Evans has had on this community. I remember, this is the guy who had Dr. Dean’s Dodgers, a t-ball team, and shaved his head when one of his patients was going through chemo. So those are really big shoes to fill, and he has just been such a pivotal person in so many lives, so many young people’s lives here. So, moving forward, I’ll miss him every bit as much as the community will miss him,” Crowe said. “He’s still going to be a vital part of this community, just in a different way.”

Just as Crowe and the patients will miss Evans, Evans will likewise miss the people and the impact they’ve had on him while he’s helped their smiles. 

“I’m going to miss them. I’ve had so much fun with all my patients and parents and families. And the thing about this area, the people make this area. There’s no greater people anywhere in the world than right here in this area. They’re good people. They’re strong people. They’re honest. And it’s just a real joy to be able to have that as patients and families, and that’s the thing that’s probably impacted me the most, is just the people,” Evans said.

— Contact Whitney Browning at wbrowning@bdtonline.com

This content was originally published here.

Orthodontist From Buffalo, N.Y., Reinvented Himself as Tennis Resort Owner in Florida – WSJ

Murray Klauber, an orthodontist from Buffalo, N.Y., reinvented himself as the owner of a Florida tennis resort where Nick Bollettieri taught tennis and Al Gore practiced for debates, before a dispute sent the business into a death spiral.

This content was originally published here.

Does my child need to wait until they have all of their permanent teeth to see an orthodontist? | American Association of Orthodontists

If someone tells you that your child should have all of his/her permanent teeth before visiting the orthodontist for the first time, that “someone” is incorrect . In fact, putting off a first visit to the orthodontist until all of a child’s permanent teeth are in could do more harm than good. Here’s why:

There’s a lot more going on than meets the eye.

A child’s mouth is a busy place. Think about a 6-year-old. Everything is growing, including the bones in the jaw and face. At around age 6, the first permanent molars appear. An exchange of teeth begins as baby teeth fall out and are replaced by larger-sized permanent teeth. And it all happens in a predictable, particular order. Unless it doesn’t.

The gums hide about two-thirds of each tooth, as well as all the bone that hold teeth in place. The gums can mask conditions that interfere with the emergence of teeth.

Parents can watch for clues. Early or late loss of baby teeth can signal a problem. So can trouble with chewing or biting, speech difficulties and mouth-breathing. If these indicators are not addressed until a child has all of his/her permanent teeth and growth is essentially complete, correcting the problem may be more difficult than it might have been had treatment occurred earlier.

Orthodontic treatment is about creating a healthy bite – the beautiful smile is a bonus.

The goal of orthodontic treatment is to make sure the bite is right – that upper and lower teeth fit together like interlocking gears. The timing of your child’s treatment is critical and is based on his/her individual needs.

Some children can wait until they have all or most of their permanent teeth. Other children’s orthodontic problems may be better treated while some baby teeth are present. These children require growth guidance of bones in the upper and lower jaws, so there’s enough room for permanent teeth. Their treatment can be timed to predictable stages of dental development and physical growth. Once teeth and jaws are in alignment, a beautiful smile is the bonus result of treatment.

Dentists and orthodontists look at the mouth differently.

Both doctors work in the mouth. But perspectives differ based on the care they provide.

Dentists assess and promote overall oral health. They look for cavities and gum disease. They advise patients on diet and home hygiene care. And they monitor patients for diseases that appear in or affect the mouth. Dentists take “bite wing” x-rays to isolate a particular section of teeth as part of their diagnosis and treatment planning process. Orthodontic evaluations may be a lower priority for dentists.

Orthodontists are laser-focused on each patient’s bite. Orthodontists use “panoramic” x-rays to visualize all of the teeth above and below the gums, and the jaws, all at once. The bite is orthodontists’ area of specialization. 

If your dentist has not referred your child to an orthodontist, you need not wait for a referral. Orthodontists do not require a referral for your child to be seen.

Here’s what the experts say: remember age 7.

The American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) recommends that children have their first visit with an orthodontist no later than age 7. If a problem is detected and treatment is advised, you are giving the orthodontist the opportunity to provide your child with the most appropriate treatment at the most appropriate time.

To answer the question that headlines this blog, there’s no need to wait until your child has lost all his/her baby teeth before you consult an orthodontist. It’s fine to talk to an orthodontist as soon as you suspect a problem in your child, even if your child is younger than 7. Many orthodontists offer a free or low-cost initial consultation. And adults – there’s no time like the present to talk to an orthodontist about getting the smile you’ve always wanted. Locate AAO orthodontists through Find an Orthodontist.

This content was originally published here.

Maryland family says orthodontist vanishes after they paid $3K for braces – Story | WTTG

A Maryland family says their dentist vanished without a trace after they paid $3,000 for braces for their teenage daughter and now the teen is experiencing complications as her family scrambles to…

This content was originally published here.