The New Invisalign® Outcome Simulator 4.0 – iTero® Element™ Intraoral Scanner

Often Imitated. Never Simulated. Exclusive to the iTero® Element™ Scanner, the Invisalign® Outcome Simulator gives you a fun and engaging way to communicate the potential benefits of Invisalign treatment while increasing case acceptance. Simulated outcomes make it easy to show the benefits possible with Invisalign and may motivate greater patient acceptance. 3D Progress Tracking At…

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8 Celebrities Who Used Invisalign Treatment

A lot of people feel that, once they are adults or older teens, the time to improve their smiles with braces has gone by. But, thanks to advanced cosmetic dentistry, Invisalign allows many people to discreetly straighten their teeth without calling attention to the work.

Not convinced? Invisalign dentists straightened the smiles of all these celebrities while they were in the public eye:

1. Khloe Kardashian’s Invisalign Treatment

As a reality star, Khloe Kardashian is rarely far from the public view, which makes her self-improvement projects all the more noticeable. She’s slimmed down significantly during her years in the spotlight, shedding over 30 pounds with the help of a personal trainer. She decided to straighten her smile, as well, and had her braces put on last year at the age of 28.

Invisalign-Treatment-Justin2. Justin Bieber’s Invisalign Treatment

This Baby singer was still a teenager when he opted for clear Invisalign braces. In a Youtube video, he praised the braces’ unobtrusive look. The unobtrusive nature of the braces meant that they could really only be seen when he took them out to show them off.

Invisalign-Treatment-Katherine3. Katherine Heigl’s Invisalign Treatment

Actress Katherine Heigl began wearing Invisalign in 2007 in preparation for her wedding. With these discreet braces, she could keep attention on her instead of on the corrections to her teeth. These days, the former Grey’s Anatomy star is all smiles as she prepares for the premiere of her upcoming TV series State of Affairs.

Invisalign-Treatment-Tom4. Tom Cruise’s Invisalign Treatment

Hollywood hunk Tom Cruise has always been famous for his smile. But, when the star began bringing his kids to the orthodontist in 2002, he discovered that his front teeth were not as straight as they could be. He chose a combination of Invisalign and ceramic brackets to keep his smile metal-free while straightening his teeth.

Invisalign-treatment-Gisele5. Gisele Bundchen’s Invisalign Treatment

Not even supermodels are born perfect! Gisele Bunchen told interviewers that she started wearing Invisalign because one of her teeth was moving and made her smile look less than perfect in pictures. She wore the braces only at night, taking advantage of the Invisalign system’s flexibility.

Invisalign-Treatment-Zac6. Zac Efron’s Invisalign Treatment

As this actor made the jump from teen heart throb in High School Musical to grown-up stunner in fare like The Neighbors, he decided that it was time for the slight gap between his front teeth to transition to a solid white smile, as well.

Invisalign-treatment-eva7. Eva Longoria’s Invisalign Treatment

This steamy star began wearing Invisalign at age 36 to straighten her bottom teeth. No longer spooked by a crooked smile, the star is working on a new horror TV series based on Latin American folk tales.

Invisalign-Treatment-Serena8. Serena Williams’ Invisalign Treatment

This powerful tennis player made sure that her smile was as strong as her serve by wearing Invisalign braces as a teenager. Years later, she has a straight and stunning smile, and continues to stack up the Grand Slam wins.

Are you ready to take on your insecurities and improve your smile? Talk to a local dentist about Invisalign in Mansfield. There are a number of highly qualified Mansfield MA dentists who can talk to you about whether these invisible braces are right for you.

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HP and Smile Direct Club want to disrupt orthodontics with 3D-printed braces | VentureBeat

HP and SmileDirectClub hope to disrupt the $12 billion orthodontics business by making 3D-printed teeth molds.

At the Rapid 2019 3D printing conference, the company said they will use 49 HP Jet Fusion 3D printing systems around the clock to make more than 50,000 unique mouth molds per day. This means they have the capacity to make as many as 20 million individualized 3D-printed mouth molds in the next 12 months.

The goal is to revolutionize the way millions of people achieve a straighter smile.

“SmileDirectClub is digitally transforming the traditional orthodontics industry, making it more personal, affordable, and convenient for millions of consumers to achieve a smile they’ll love,” said Alex Fenkell, cofounder of SmileDirectClub, in a statement. “HP’s breakthrough 3D printing and data intelligence platform makes this level of disruption possible for us, pushing productivity, quality, and manufacturing predictability to unprecedented levels, all with economics that allow us to pass on savings to the consumers seeking treatment using our teledentistry platform.”

The orthodontics industry is 120 years old. SmileDirectClub cofounders Fenkell and Jordan Katzman first met at summer camp as teens with metal braces. They decided later that innovations in technology and telehealth could democratize access to safe, affordable, and convenient orthodontic care.

They started the company in 2014 using a digital network of state-licensed dentists and orthodontists who prescribe teeth straightening treatment plans and manage all aspects of clinical care — from diagnosis to the completion of treatment — using the company’s proprietary teledentistry platform. To date, they have served half a million customers in the U.S., Canada, and Puerto Rico, with plans to expand to Australia and the United Kingdom in 2019.

An estimated 80% of Americans could benefit from orthodontic care, yet only 1% receive it each year, with cost being the biggest prohibitive issue. In the U.S., 60% of counties do not have access to an orthodontist. By leveraging the benefits of teledentistry coupled with HP’s 3D printing technology, SmileDirectClub is bridging these gaps, offering people a chance to build confidence through a straighter, brighter smile at a cost that is up to 60% less than traditional options.

SmileDirectClub and its manufacturing partners rely on HP Jet Fusion 3D printing solutions to produce the mouth molds for each patient’s aligners and retainers, creating an average of more than 50,000 personalized mouth molds each day.

“SmileDirectClub and HP are reinventing the future of orthodontics, pushing the boundaries of customized 3D mass production and democratizing access to affordable, high-quality teeth straightening for millions of people,” said Christoph Schell, president of 3D Printing and Digital Manufacturing at HP, in a statement. “Through this collaboration, HP is helping SmileDirectClub accelerate its growth, enabling a new era of personalized consumer experiences only made possible by industrial 3D printing and digital manufacturing.”

HP and SmileDirectClub also announced a new recycling program, through which excess 3D material and already processed plastic mouth molds are recycled by HP and turned into pellets for traditional injection molding, leading to more sustainable production.

This content was originally published here.

Wilmington orthodontist uses 3D technology to get straight teeth

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For Jessica Keogh, braces were not an option.

The 33-year-old never had them growing up as a kid. She’s always wanted to fix her crowded bottom teeth but hated the idea of sporting braces as an adult.

When her cousin told her about a website where a Wilmington orthodontist will give her a free consult about getting clear, plastic aligners to straighten her teeth, she gave it a shot. 

Now, months later, Keogh wears her aligners every day. Most people don’t realize she has them at work.

“Who wants braces,” she said, “Obviously, I’m going to take this.”

More: Westside Family Healthcare to close Middletown location Nov. 28

Wilmington orthodontist John Nista has developed a new process called “Simply Fast Smiles” that combines new industry concepts and emerging technology. The doctor said through clear, plastic trays, he can straighten some people’s teeth in six months. And the bill is typically about $3,000, half the normal cost of most sets of braces.

“If you say you’re going to the orthodontist because you need braces, the first thing that goes to your mind is that it’s going to be expensive, it’s going to take time and it’s going to be painful,” he said. 

“My piece of the puzzle doesn’t have to do that.”

Nista uses a 3-D scanner and printer, as well as advanced software, to create about 25 plastic moving aligners. He prints all of the plastic trays at the same time for the patients, resulting in fewer check-up appointments. The patients wear a new aligner every week, which incrementally straightens their teeth. 

Read: How’s your marriage? UD prof will pay you to tell her

While this program can be for anyone with adult teeth, most of his patients have been adults who have had previous dental work. 

Nista, who has been an orthodontist for 28 years, said the industry has changed and adapted its practices every couple of decades. But it wasn’t until Invisalign was created in the late 1990s that there has been such a major technological breakthrough in orthodontics, he said.

Invisalign showed orthodontists that clear, plastic aligners can efficiently move people’s teeth while avoiding the severe pain and unattractive look of braces. Forbes reported in April that Invisalign hit its 4 millionth patient last September. In 2016, the company’s sales reached $1 billion for the first time. 

In recent years, it has led to the creation of a handful of other clear aligner competitor companies. 

The startup SmileDirectClub has received national attention in recent months for its business model of saying it will straighten people’s teeth — without in-person doctor consults and X-rays.

People can get fit for aligners by going to a SmileDirectClub store or ordering a mail-in kit. The aligners are then sent in the mail and cost $1,850. There aren’t any locations based in Delaware. 

More: Report: Delaware ties for worst state in hospital safety

The American Association of Orthodontists has filed complaints with dental boards and attorney generals in 36 states against the company, saying its service can lead to medical risks. 

While Nista is also wary of the company, since there’s no direct contact with a doctor, he said it does signify the changing times of the industry. People don’t want to pay a fortune and invest a lot of time to get straight teeth.

“There is a big wave of this coming,” he said.

The first step of Nista’s “Simply Fast Smiles” is the free online consultation — which is done via selfie.

To see if a patient qualifies, Nista asks people to complete the “Smile Test” by submitting four photos that show different angles of a person’s mouth through his website. The images will be sent directly to Nista’s email. He’ll then determine the amount of work he or she needs and email the patient directly.

The idea to use telemedicine for orthodontics came to him when he watched his niece, a dermatologist, do a consult on her phone while on the beach during a family vacation. There’s no reason he couldn’t do the same thing, Nista recalled thinking. 

“Everyone knows how to take a selfie,” he said. 

Nista said it only takes orthodontists a couple minutes (at most) to decide if the aligners can properly straighten a person’s teeth in a short period of time. Looking at images via email saves time for both him and potential patients, he said. 

Telemedicine applications have become increasingly popular because doctors can treat patients in the comfort of their own homes reducing costs including travel time. The Medical Society of Delaware and Nemours/Alfred I. DuPont Hospital for Children have encouraged their doctors to use this technology in the past year. 

In addition to orthodontic X-rays and photographs, Nista uses software that takes a digital scan of a patient’s mouth. The computer program then shows what it will take for the teeth to get into a “goal position.”

It also creates the design of the 25 plastic aligners which are then 3D printed at the same time. Whitening gel is also included in the individual aligners.

For most patients, the aligners are changed about once a week. Additional aligners can be printed over the course of the six months if necessary, Nista said.

Read: Wilmington offers free health care to pets, their humans

Unlike other patients, Keogh has about 40 aligners due to the amount of work she needs on her teeth. She said the whole process was a lot easier than what she imagined, especially with the payments. 

She was still quoted a total of about $3,000. That’s about $800 less than what her mother paid for aligners at another practice. Since Keogh paid for it upfront, she said she doesn’t need to worry about for copays or charges for follow-up appointments.

Now at the halfway point, Keogh said she’s seen progress in her bottom teeth. It’s already boosted her confidence, she said. 

“I can’t wait till they’re all the way straight,” Keogh said. 

Contact Meredith Newman at (302) 324-2386 or at mnewman@delawareonline.com. Follow her on Twitter at @merenewman.

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Things Your Orthodontist Won’t Tell You

Close up macro shot of a male mouth laughing and showing his straight teethicsnaps/ShutterstockYour smile is one of the first things somebody notices about you, and seeing an orthodontist practically ensures you’ll always have straight, pearly whites. At least, that’s the idea. But as with any other doctor, your orthodontist has some things they wish you knew, but probably won’t ever tell you. (By the way, you’ll definitely want to follow these 10 golden rules for white, healthy teeth.)

Someone else might’ve used your braces before you

Beautiful young woman with brackets on teeth close upVP Photo Studio/ShutterstockBefore you get grossed out, this isn’t always the case—and if it is, it’s not actually as skeevy as you might think. According to foxnews.com, some orthodontists professionally sterilize and remanufacture used braces through companies like Ortho-Cycle, which saves up to 50 percent on costs. This process “is based upon the dissolution of polymerized acrylates at temperatures at which simultaneous sterilization occurs,” according to orthocycle.com.

We know when you haven’t been wearing your Invisalign

Close-up Of Woman's Hand Putting Transparent Aligner In TeethAndrey_Popov/ShutterstockDespite how persistent you are when you tell your orthodontist you’ve been actively wearing your Invisalign, they’ll know the truth right away. “We know if you haven’t been wearing your Invisalign because of a cool feature [on the aligners] (not just because of your answer to our question or the way your teeth look),” says Dr. Matthew LoPresti, DDS, a cosmetic dentist in Stamford, CT. “There are little blue marks towards the back of your aligners that should wear away as you wear the Invisalign. If the blue mark looks untouched, we know you haven’t been wearing the aligners.” (Here are some things your dentists NEEDS you to start doing differently.)

Your treatment will probably take longer than what we initially tell you

Close up of smiling black woman at dentistRocketclips, Inc./ShutterstockYour orthodontist might tell you your treatment will only take a year and a half to two years, but that’s a rough estimate. A lot of treatments take much longer than expected. “Delays in the process may occur like a misdiagnosis of your case, patient’s neglect, or unanticipated movement of the teeth,” says Danica Lacson, a representative for Hawaii Family Dental.

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Our fees might be negotiable

Credit cards close upsumire8/ShutterstockLet’s be honest, a trip to the orthodontist is anything but cheap. “The good news, though, is that orthodontists offer a variety of payment plans. Many allow patients to pay through monthly installments with no interest, and with some orthodontists, you can negotiate the fee itself,” according to foxnews.com. “Some orthodontists will give a discount, usually 5 to 10 percent, if you pay the total in cash or with a credit card at the beginning of treatment.” (You won’t believe these shocking diseases that dentists find first.)

You have to wear retainers after you complete your treatment—forever

teeth with retainerOlga Miltsova/ShutterstockIf you think you’re done with orthodontics after you finish your treatment—think again. “A retainer holds your teeth in place. After you complete Invisalign or any orthodontics, it is necessary to hold those teeth in place,” says Dr. LoPresti. “There are different options which include a removable clear retainer that is worn at night or a permanent fixed retainer that gets bonded to the back of your teeth.”

We know when you’re lying about wearing your retainer

Dentist holding Retainer, Orthodontics Dental concept backgroundponsulak/ShutterstockNot only do you have to wear a retainer after you complete your treatment, but your orthodontist will definitely know if you’ve really been keeping up with it. “Patients that complete their advised treatment and achieve their desired result but then fail to wear their retainers, generally have teeth that drift apart,” says Dr. Timothy Chase, co-founder of SmilesNY. “This can cause a relapse such as crowding, spacing or flaring of the teeth.” (Whatever you do, never, ever ignore these symptoms of a cavity.)

We know when you eat or drink with your Invisalign in

Macro close up of healthy female teeth biting raspberry.karelnoppe/ShutterstockIt might seem harmless to eat or drink with your aligners in, but you won’t be fooling your orthodontist. “When patients eat or drink liquids (other than water) come in to see me, their Invisalign trays are often slimy, dirty, and stained,” says Dr. Chase. “Not only does this result in a cosmetically undesirable appearance to the aligners but it also damages them and can lead to decay.”

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Braces aren’t just a cosmetic treatment

Close-up of ceramic and metallic braces on teeth. Orthodontic Treatment. Dental Care Conceptsalajean/ShutterstockIt might seem like people go to the orthodontist just to straighten out their teeth, but there are tons of other reasons, too. While some people can go through life with crooked teeth and be just fine, others actually require fixture in order to chew and speak properly. “While we do want everyone to have a perfect smile, the reality is not everyone requires orthodontics,” says Seth Newman, DDS, a board-certified orthodontic specialist. (You’ll never catch your dentist eating these 15 foods—and you shouldn’t be snacking on them, either.)

We know you don’t floss or brush as much as you say you do

Close-up Of Young African Woman Flossing TeethAndrey_Popov/ShutterstockRemember all those times you lied to your dentist or orthodontist when they asked if you’ve been flossing? Yeah… they knew you weren’t. “Those who do not brush and floss properly generally have a higher incidence of plaque calculus, gingivitis, and tooth decay,” says Dr. Chase. “A single day of forgetting to floss is damaging but a week or a month of poor hygiene will result in swelling of the gums, bleeding and a foul odor.” (This is the easiest way to get rid of bad breath, according to a dentist.)

Even if you don’t think your child needs orthodontics, get them checked out anyway

retainer for teeth - Beautiful smiling girl with retainer for teethpattara puttiwong/ ShutterstockEven if your child doesn’t show any signs of needing to see an orthodontist, you should really bring them in for a check-up no later than age seven. “If we see a patient early, we can remove baby teeth and the canine has a good possibility of coming in properly,” according to Dr. Jackie Miller, an orthodontist in Washington, MO, and member of the American Association of Orthodontists. “An early visit to the orthodontist can prevent and help detect future problems.” (Here are some dental etiquette rules everyone should follow.)

If you smoke, your treatment might take longer

Beauty & SmokeQuinn Martin/ShutterstockIn case you needed more of a reason to not smoke, it might actually cause you to need to make more trips to your orthodontist’s office. “Smokers give away their habit because of the excessive plaque that builds up on their teeth,” according to Dr. Chase. “This can have a big impact orthodontic appliances used to straighten teeth and result in a longer treatment period.”

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This content was originally published here.

What if My Dentist Hasn’t Sent My Child to the Orthodontist? | American Association of Orthodontists

You don’t have to wait for your dentist to refer your child to an orthodontist.

Parents are often the first to recognize that something is not quite right about their child’s teeth or their jaws. A parent may notice that the front teeth don’t come together when the back teeth are closed, or that the upper teeth are sitting inside of the lower teeth. They may assume that their dentist is aware of the anomaly, and that the dentist will make a referral to an orthodontist when the time is right. A referral might not happen if the dentist isn’t evaluating the bite.

AAO orthodontists don’t require a referral from a dentist to make an appointment with them.

Dentists and orthodontists may have different perspectives.

Dentists are looking at the overall health of the teeth and mouth. He/she could be looking at how well the patient brushes and flosses, or if there are cavities. While dentists look at the upper and lower teeth, they may not study how the upper and lower teeth make contact.

Orthodontists are looking at the bite, meaning the way teeth come together. This is orthodontists’ specialty. Orthodontists take the upper and lower jaws into account. Even if teeth appear to be straight, mismatched jaws can be part of a bad bite.

A healthy bite is the goal of orthodontic treatment.

A healthy bite denotes good function – biting, chewing and speaking. It also means teeth and jaws are in proportion to the rest of the face.

The AAO recommends children get their first check-up with an AAO orthodontist no later than age 7.

Kids have a mix of baby and permanent teeth around age 7. AAO orthodontists are uniquely trained to evaluate children’s growth as well as the exchange of baby teeth for permanent teeth. Orthodontists are expertly qualified to determine whether a problem exists, or if one is developing.

AAO orthodontists often offer initial exams at no (or low) cost, and at no obligation.

Visit Find an Orthodontist for AAO orthodontists near you.

When you choose an AAO orthodontist for orthodontic treatment, you can be assured that you have selected a highly skilled specialist. Orthodontists are experts in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics – properly aligned teeth and jaws – and possesses the skills and experience to give you your best smile. Locate AAO orthodontists through Find an Orthodontist at aaoinfo.org.

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My Orthodontist Thinks I Need Invisalign

I don’t try to make bad choices. Really, I don’t. In fact, I don’t think most people set out to do make them either. I think we all end up in a place we hoped not to be and in retrospect say, well, that was probably a bad idea.

Such was my life this past week when I found myself sitting in an orthodontist’s office being handed an estimate for approximately $8,000 (for Invisalign, I don’t want more braces, of which $3,500 would be covered by my insurance), that would essentially correct (or finish) the job I assumed was completed when I paid $4,000 to get my teefus fixed back in 2012. As sad as it is that if I have to pay all over again, how we got to this point is so much dumber than you can possibly imagine.

It all started in 2007 when I told my then-dentist I wanted braces. In order to do so, I was going to have to get my wisdom teeth removed, so I had all four of my wisdom teeth removed at the same time. Can we talk about that for a minute? Yes, let’s. If you’ve had your wisdom teeth removed, you know they can do general (put you out) or local (numb your mouth) anesthesia. Because all of my wisdom teeth were erupted, they opted for local anesthesia. This is where I learned about how my body responds to numbing agents and pain killers. Basically, it doesn’t. My mouth was numb for a solid 10 minutes before I started to feel the orthodontist literally breaking my teeth in half with some pliers.

Nigga. I cried so hard. It hurt so much, but I made it through thinking that I’d get some pain killers and be high off my gourd for the next week. First, they prescribed me Vicodin. It didn’t work. Then Percocet. Which also didn’t work. Literally, my body didn’t respond to pain killers AT ALL. I pretty much had to wait out the pain in the fetal position on my couch at home for a week and some change. After that experience, I put braces out of my mind, because short of checkups, I didn’t want anything unnecessary done to my teeth.

But then (and we’re about to get to the shenanigans now), while riding around in my car in 2011, I heard a commercial for braces and I said to myself, “P, you should get braces.” There was some number to call, so I called it. And it led me to a dentist’s office in Maryland. Well, I live in Washington, D.C., so that made sense. I scheduled an appointment and showed up for my consultation. And no lie when I tell you I was so dumbfounded at this office: the dentist was a black man but his entire office looked like a Pitbull video shoot. I was in an office full of some of the most beautiful women I’d ever seen. And they all worked there. As far as medical office spaces go, it might as well have been heaven.

I even remember calling a few of the homies to be like, “If you need a dentist, THIS IS WHERE YOU NEED TO BE!” I got my consultation and was told the braces would run me $4,000, and I’d walk away with pristine pearly whites. And all of the work would be handled in-house. And I should just come to them for regular dental services. Cool. SIGN ME UP.

That’s where it started going downhill. For one, while I thought the office was unreal, it was easily the most inappropriate office I’d ever been in. The dental assistants were a little too friendly and familiar. I’m not saying it was a happy endings spot or anything, I’m just saying the folks who worked there were super comfortable in ways that I’m not sure are…appropriate. Well, I got my braces and paid the cost to be the boss. Once that was done, and because my insurance changed, that office was no longer an option. Which made me sad, but I also figured that one complaint might take that office off the map anyway, so perhaps it was just time to move on.

I had permanent retainers on the back of my teeth and recently, the retainers on the back of my top row snapped. Because I could feel my teeth almost immediately start to shift, I found an orthodontist and scheduled an appointment the same way I found any new doctors: I checked the list of folks who would accept my insurance and looked for the black folks.

I went in for an appointment, and in the nicest possible way (and without professionally shitting on her fellow unnamed dentist), the orthodontist was like, “Yeah, your teeth ain’t supposed to do what they’re doing, ever, but since I wasn’t there in the first place, I’m not sure if this is accidental or intentional.” You can imagine how hard I clutched my pearls since I JUST got my braces off in 2012. I asked if she was saying the other dentist fucked up my teeth but made it look like the job was done and she would neither confirm nor deny this. I told her that’s what I get for staying at an office because everybody looks like J.Lo.

In order to address and correct the issue, the estimate came back a cool $8,000 strong. I’d feel dumb not getting them fixed since that was a decision I made in the first place and my teeth would just start crip walking again. Mildly, but a crip walk is a crip walk. But I can’t help but thinking I got got by a dentist’s office that didn’t feel right and stuck me for $4,000 out of pocket. And my teeth aren’t terrible, but the new ortho noticed some things that she had various curiosities about.

And it all takes me back to the fact that I seriously picked an office for braces based on a radio ad.

The moral of the story: Don’t pick dentist offices based on radio ads.

This content was originally published here.

7 Facts About Orthodontics | American Association of Orthodontists

Whether you call the process “braces,” “orthodontics,” or simply straightening your teeth, these 7 facts about orthodontics – the very first recognized specialty within the dental profession – may surprise you.

1. The word “orthodontics” is of Greek origin.

“Ortho” means straight or correct. “Dont” (not to be confused with “don’t”) means tooth. Put it all together and “orthodontics” means straight teeth.

2. People have had crooked teeth for eons.

Crooked teeth have been around since the time of Neanderthal man. Archeologists have found Egyptian mummies with crude metal bands wrapped around teeth. Hippocrates wrote about “irregularities” of the teeth around 400 BCE* – he meant misaligned teeth and jaws.

About 2,100 years later, a French dentist named Pierre Fauchard wrote about an orthodontic appliance in his 1728 landmark book on dentistry, The Surgeon Dentist: A Treatise on the Teeth. He described the bandeau, a piece of horseshoe-shaped precious metal which was literally tied to teeth to align them.*

3. Orthodontics became the first dental specialty in 1900.

Edward H. Angle founded the specialty. He was the first orthodontist: the first member of the dental profession to limit his practice to orthodontics only – moving teeth and aligning jaws. Angle established what is now the American Association of Orthodontists, which admits only orthodontists as members.

4. Gold was the metal of choice for braces circa 1900.

Gold is malleable, so it was easy to shape it into an orthodontic appliance. Because gold is malleable, it stretches easily. Consequently, patients had to see their orthodontist frequently for adjustments that kept treatment on track.

5. Teeth move in response to pressure over time.

Some pressure is beneficial, however, some is harmful. Actions like thumb-sucking or swallowing in an abnormal way generate damaging pressure. Teeth can be pushed out of place; bone can be distorted.

Orthodontists use appliances like braces or aligners to apply a constant, gentle pressure on teeth to guide them into their ideal positions.

6. Teeth can move because bone breaks down and rebuilds.

Cells called “osteoclasts” break down bone. “Osteoblast” cells rebuild bone. The process is called “bone remodeling.” A balanced diet helps support bone remodeling. Feed your bones!

7. Orthodontic treatment is a professional service.

It’s not a commodity or a product. The type of “appliance” used to move teeth is nothing more than a tool in the hands of the expert. Each tool has its uses, but not every tool is right for every job. A saw and a paring knife both cut, but you wouldn’t use a saw to slice an apple. (We hope not, anyway!)

A Partnership for Success

Orthodontic treatment is a partnership between the patient and the orthodontist. While the orthodontist provides the expertise, treatment plan and appliances to straighten teeth and align jaws, it’s the patient who’s the key to success.

The patient commits to following the orthodontist’s instructions on brushing and flossing, watching what they eat and drink, and wearing rubber bands (if prescribed). Most importantly, the patient commits to keeping scheduled appointments with the orthodontist. Teeth and jaws can move in the right directions and on schedule when the patient takes an active part in their treatment.

AAO orthodontists are ready to partner with you to align your teeth and jaws for a healthy and beautiful smile.

When you choose an AAO orthodontist for orthodontic treatment, you can be assured that you have selected a highly skilled specialist. Orthodontists are experts in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics – properly aligning teeth and jaws – and possess the skills and experience to give you your best smile. Locate AAO orthodontists through Find an Orthodontist at aaoinfo.org.

This content was originally published here.

Long-time orthodontist inspires former patient to follow in his steps

BLUEFIELD, Va. — Dr. Dean Evans, who has served the Bluefield, Va. community for 37 years by providing orthodontic treatment to both children and adults, is now in the transitional process of passing his practice on to Dr. Tyler Crowe, a former patient. 

Evans, who’s father was a dentist, grew up in Welch before moving to Princeton in 6th grade. 

After deciding on orthodontics as a profession he went on to attend Concord College and West Virginia University where he then attended the School of Dentistry and completed his orthodontic residency program. Directly out of his residency, he and his wife spent three years in Alaska with the Air Force. Afterward, he returned to the Bluefield area where he began practicing orthodontics. 

“It’s the most fun practice of dentistry,” Evans said. “Orthodontics is just fun. I love the work, I love the kids, I love the adults.”

Crowe said he was Evans’ patient roughly 15 years ago and that Evans is who ultimately inspired him to become an orthodontist.

“After coming here and getting my braces off and just the whole experience I just wanted to be able to provide that experience to other kids,” Crowe said. “The years that you have braces are very impressionable years. Just that impression that you can have. I know what it did for me and how I felt personally about myself through orthodontic treatment, so I wanted to be able to have an impact on other kids in that way.”

According to both Crowe and Evans, they proceeded to stay in touch through the years as Crowe applied to dental school and orthodontics residency where he too graduated from West Virginia University.

As Crowe neared the end of his residency they began discussing his future and what opportunities were ahead locally. 

“To be quite frank, I’m not ready to stop practicing. In my mind I was always focused on another five to 10 more years, and then Dr. Crowe came by and he asked if I would be interested in selling the practice,” Evans said. “So I started thinking about it, and say in five years, I want to practice five or 10 more years, and I put out my for sale sign, I may not get anybody half the quality or half the character that Dr. Crowe is.”

According to Evans the final deciding point came when Crowe advised him that he would keep the full staff – which he says is a rare move by new doctors.

In April, Evans disclosed the exciting news with his patients where he shared that his job is more of a calling he never took lightly and he believes Crowe will ensure optimal orthodontic care to all patients. 

The outpouring of love to Evans by his patients thus included their welcoming of Crowe in May as the two began working together in anticipation for Evans’ retirement. According to Evans, this is to secure Crowe is comfortable with the diagnosis and treatment plans and that the patients are likewise comfortable with Crowe. Evans plans to stay a minimum of 60 days or longer based on the comfort level by all parties involved.

“It was important to both of us that this be smooth and the patients feel comfortable with me. So as we plotted it out, we wanted to make sure they had the opportunity to see both of us at the same time. That way it wouldn’t feel so abrupt to anyone,” Crowe said. 

Evans has put optimal trust in Crowe.

“He’s very focused. He’s very detailed for perfection, and as a perfectionist, he’s a perfectionist like I am, it drives you crazy to try to get perfection. It’s just so hard to do that, but he’s very much like that,’’ Evans said of Crowe. “He has a good eye for detail. He’s very very gentle. He’s got good hands. He’s got good patient communication skills.”

Crowe says the transition thus far has been relatively easy as he considers his relationship with Evans to be a friendship unlike the experience of many business transitions. Crowe has also received a positive response from the patients and families.

“I do want to reiterate just the importance that Dr. Evans has had on this community. I remember, this is the guy who had Dr. Dean’s Dodgers, a t-ball team, and shaved his head when one of his patients was going through chemo. So those are really big shoes to fill, and he has just been such a pivotal person in so many lives, so many young people’s lives here. So, moving forward, I’ll miss him every bit as much as the community will miss him,” Crowe said. “He’s still going to be a vital part of this community, just in a different way.”

Just as Crowe and the patients will miss Evans, Evans will likewise miss the people and the impact they’ve had on him while he’s helped their smiles. 

“I’m going to miss them. I’ve had so much fun with all my patients and parents and families. And the thing about this area, the people make this area. There’s no greater people anywhere in the world than right here in this area. They’re good people. They’re strong people. They’re honest. And it’s just a real joy to be able to have that as patients and families, and that’s the thing that’s probably impacted me the most, is just the people,” Evans said.

— Contact Whitney Browning at wbrowning@bdtonline.com

This content was originally published here.

Orthodontist From Buffalo, N.Y., Reinvented Himself as Tennis Resort Owner in Florida – WSJ

Murray Klauber, an orthodontist from Buffalo, N.Y., reinvented himself as the owner of a Florida tennis resort where Nick Bollettieri taught tennis and Al Gore practiced for debates, before a dispute sent the business into a death spiral.

This content was originally published here.

Does my child need to wait until they have all of their permanent teeth to see an orthodontist? | American Association of Orthodontists

If someone tells you that your child should have all of his/her permanent teeth before visiting the orthodontist for the first time, that “someone” is incorrect . In fact, putting off a first visit to the orthodontist until all of a child’s permanent teeth are in could do more harm than good. Here’s why:

There’s a lot more going on than meets the eye.

A child’s mouth is a busy place. Think about a 6-year-old. Everything is growing, including the bones in the jaw and face. At around age 6, the first permanent molars appear. An exchange of teeth begins as baby teeth fall out and are replaced by larger-sized permanent teeth. And it all happens in a predictable, particular order. Unless it doesn’t.

The gums hide about two-thirds of each tooth, as well as all the bone that hold teeth in place. The gums can mask conditions that interfere with the emergence of teeth.

Parents can watch for clues. Early or late loss of baby teeth can signal a problem. So can trouble with chewing or biting, speech difficulties and mouth-breathing. If these indicators are not addressed until a child has all of his/her permanent teeth and growth is essentially complete, correcting the problem may be more difficult than it might have been had treatment occurred earlier.

Orthodontic treatment is about creating a healthy bite – the beautiful smile is a bonus.

The goal of orthodontic treatment is to make sure the bite is right – that upper and lower teeth fit together like interlocking gears. The timing of your child’s treatment is critical and is based on his/her individual needs.

Some children can wait until they have all or most of their permanent teeth. Other children’s orthodontic problems may be better treated while some baby teeth are present. These children require growth guidance of bones in the upper and lower jaws, so there’s enough room for permanent teeth. Their treatment can be timed to predictable stages of dental development and physical growth. Once teeth and jaws are in alignment, a beautiful smile is the bonus result of treatment.

Dentists and orthodontists look at the mouth differently.

Both doctors work in the mouth. But perspectives differ based on the care they provide.

Dentists assess and promote overall oral health. They look for cavities and gum disease. They advise patients on diet and home hygiene care. And they monitor patients for diseases that appear in or affect the mouth. Dentists take “bite wing” x-rays to isolate a particular section of teeth as part of their diagnosis and treatment planning process. Orthodontic evaluations may be a lower priority for dentists.

Orthodontists are laser-focused on each patient’s bite. Orthodontists use “panoramic” x-rays to visualize all of the teeth above and below the gums, and the jaws, all at once. The bite is orthodontists’ area of specialization. 

If your dentist has not referred your child to an orthodontist, you need not wait for a referral. Orthodontists do not require a referral for your child to be seen.

Here’s what the experts say: remember age 7.

The American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) recommends that children have their first visit with an orthodontist no later than age 7. If a problem is detected and treatment is advised, you are giving the orthodontist the opportunity to provide your child with the most appropriate treatment at the most appropriate time.

To answer the question that headlines this blog, there’s no need to wait until your child has lost all his/her baby teeth before you consult an orthodontist. It’s fine to talk to an orthodontist as soon as you suspect a problem in your child, even if your child is younger than 7. Many orthodontists offer a free or low-cost initial consultation. And adults – there’s no time like the present to talk to an orthodontist about getting the smile you’ve always wanted. Locate AAO orthodontists through Find an Orthodontist.

This content was originally published here.

Maryland family says orthodontist vanishes after they paid $3K for braces – Story | WTTG

A Maryland family says their dentist vanished without a trace after they paid $3,000 for braces for their teenage daughter and now the teen is experiencing complications as her family scrambles to…

This content was originally published here.